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Monthly Record Update for May 2020

Mon, 06/01/2020 - 18:03

FamilySearch expanded its free online archives in May of 2020 with over 24.1 million new indexed family history records and almost 32,000 digital images from all over the world. New historical records were added from American Samoa, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, England, Finland, France, Germany, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Mexico, Niue, Norway, Peru, Portugal, South Africa, the South Pacific, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Venezuela, and the United States, which includes Arizona, Arkansas, California, the District of Colombia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin.

United States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968, United States Public Records, 1970-2009, GenealogyBank Historical Newspaper Obituaries, 1815-2011, and United States, Slave Birth Records, 1780-1846, are included as well. Digital Images came from Italy.

Find your ancestors using these free archives online, including birth, marriage, death, and church records. Millions of new genealogy records are added each month to make your search easier.

CountryCollectionIndexed RecordsDigital ImagesCommentsAmerican Samoa American Samoa, Vital Records, 1850-193010,4590Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some Restrictions Apply)ArgentinaArgentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-198171,4160Added indexed records to an existing collectionArgentinaArgentina, Santa Fe, Catholic Church Records, 1634-19754,1630Added indexed records to an existing collectionAustriaAustria, Carinthia, Gurk Diocese, Catholic Church Records, 1527-198635,5610Added indexed records to an existing collection AustriaAustria, Vienna, Jewish Registers of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, 1784-191127,3170Added indexed records to an existing collectionBoliviaBolivia Catholic Church Records, 1566-1996180,0670Added indexed records to an existing collection BrazilBrazil, Bahia, Civil Registration, 1877-19763,4570Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Cemetery Records, 1897-20121560Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Minas Gerais, Civil Registration, 1879-194911,7820Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Paraná, Civil Registration, 1852-1996431,0730Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Santa Catarina, Civil Registration, 1850-199923,5060Added indexed records to an existing collectionCanadaCanada Census, 185172,2670Added indexed records to an existing collectionCanadaCanada, New Brunswick, County Register of Births, 1801-192010,5400Added indexed records to an existing collection CanadaNova Scotia Deaths, 1864-18771000Added indexed records to an existing collectionChileChile, Catholic Church Records, 1710-192839,2480Added indexed records to an existing collectionChileChile, Cemetery Records, 1821-201587,2200Added indexed records to an existing collectionCzech RepublicCzech Republic, Church Books, 1552-198112,1840Added indexed records to an existing collectionDominican RepublicDominican Republic Miscellaneous Records, 1921-198043,5640Added indexed records to an existing collectionDR CongoDemocratic Republic of the Congo, Census, 198461,1730New indexed records collectionEcuadorEcuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011299,9620Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Cumbria Parish Registers, 1538-1990221,0410Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537-191823,0840Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Devon, Plymouth Prison Records, 1821-191913,4950New indexed records collectionEnglandEngland, Essex Non-Conformist Church Records, 1613-19711030Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Essex Parish Registers, 1538-19972,5400Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Gloucestershire Non-Conformist Church Records, 1642-1996142,7220Added indexed records to an existing collection EnglandEngland, Index to Register of Passport Applications, 1851-1903376,4880New indexed records collectionEnglandEngland, Lancashire Non-Conformist Church Records, 1647-1996120,0190New indexed records collectionEnglandEngland, Middlesex Parish Registers, 1539-19888,2820New indexed records collection EnglandEngland, Northumberland Non-Conformist Church Records, 1613-1920125,1330Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Surrey Parish Registers, 1536-19926910Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Yorkshire Marriage Bonds and Allegations, 1613-188768,7730Added indexed records to an existing collectionFinlandFinland, Tax Lists, 1809-191548,0030Added indexed records to an existing collection FranceFrance, Coutances et d’Avranches Diocese, Catholic Parish Records, 1533-18946470Added indexed records to an existing collection FranceFrance, Finistère, Quimper et Léon Diocese, Catholic Parish Records, 1772-18941,7650Added indexed records to an existing collection GermanyGermany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1804-187743,3780Added indexed records to an existing collectionGermanyGermany, Saxony, Church Book Indexes, 1500-190032,7090New indexed records collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Alta Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877-1994449,5050Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Baja Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877-1994157,9420Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Chiquimula, Civil Registration, 1877-2008205,0310Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, El Progreso, Civil Registration, 1877-1994116,8620Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Escuintla, Civil Registration, 1877-1994339,3500Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Guatemala, Civil Registration, 1877-20061,284,9930Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Huehuetenango, Civil Registration, 1877-1994315,9230Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Izabal, Civil Registration, 1877-1994159,2890Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Jutiapa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994231,9620Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Quetzaltenango, Civil Registration, 1877-1994499,6260Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Sacatepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877-1994150,5760Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, San Marcos, Civil Registration, 1877-1994473,1630Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Santa Rosa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994204,6840Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Suchitepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877-1994278,8940Added indexed records to an existing collectionHondurasHonduras, Civil Registration, 1841-19682,4240Added indexed records to an existing collection HungaryHungary Civil Registration, 1895-198064,4990Added indexed records to an existing collectionIrelandIreland Civil Registration, 1845-1913780Added indexed records to an existing collectionIrelandIreland, Dublin, The Post Office Annual Directory and Calendar, 184319,0350New indexed records collection (Some Restrictions May Apply)IrelandIreland, Dublin, The Post Office Annual Directory and Calendar, 185864,3790New indexed records collection (Some Restrictions May Apply)IrelandIreland, John Watson Stewart, The Gentlemen’s and Citizen’s Almanac, 181417,2660New indexed records collectionIrelandIreland, Medical Directory for Ireland, 18582,3730New indexed records collectionIrelandIreland, Pettigrew and Oulton, The Dublin Almanac and General Register of Ireland, 183553,7780New indexed records collection (Some Restrictions May Apply)IrelandIreland, The Weekly Irish Times, Sinn Fein Rebellion Handbook, Easter 1916, 1916-19176,7310New indexed records collection (Some Restrictions May Apply)ItalyItaly, Avellino, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809-1947109,7260Added indexed records to an existing collection ItalyItaly, Benevento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1810-1942155,5940Added indexed records to an existing collectionItalyItaly, Brescia, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1797-194378,2750Added indexed records to an existing collectionItalyItaly, Salerno, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-194932,44731,969Added images and indexed records to an existing collectionItalyItaly, Teramo, Teramo, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-194021,5780Added indexed records to an existing collectionLuxembourgLuxembourg, Civil Registration, 1796-194133,9670Added indexed records to an existing collection MexicoMexico, Sinaloa, Civil Registration, 1861-192987,1210Added indexed records to an existing collection NiueNiue, Vital Records, 1818-199418,0990Added indexed records to an existing collectionNorwayNorway, Oslo, Akershus Prison Records, 1844-18858080New indexed records collectionPeruPeru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1935-199918,6770Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Ayacucho, Civil Registration, 1903-199971,1940Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Diocese of Huacho, Catholic Church Records, 1560-1952260,4380Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1888-1998190,3480Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Municipal Census, 1831-1866162,2450Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Piura, Civil Registration, 1874-19965,2880Added indexed records to an existing collection PeruPeru, Prelature of Yauyos-Cañete-Huarochirí, Catholic Church Records, 1665-201830,2100Added indexed records to an existing collectionPortugalPortugal, Setúbal, Catholic Church Records, 1555-191140Added indexed records to an existing collectionPuerto RicoPuerto Rico, Civil Registration, 1805-200110,1920Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Cape Province, Probate Records of the Master of the High Court, 1834-19891,196,0520Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801-200415,3640Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Civil Death Registration, 1955-196641,0540Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Civil Marriage Records, 1840-1973137,3720Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, KwaZulu Natal, Vital Records, 1868-19767,1720Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Natal Province, Civil Deaths, 1863-195515,8580Added indexed records to an existing collection South AfricaSouth Africa, Transvaal, Civil Death, 1869-19541,7950Added indexed records to an existing collection South Pacific (New Zealand)Niue, Vital Records, 1818-19941,4030New indexed records collectionSwedenSweden, Örebro Church Records, 1613-1918; index 1635-186027,2850Added indexed records to an existing collection SwedenSweden, Stockholm City Archives, Index to Church Records, 1546-192762,5600Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited KingdomUnited Kingdom, Quakers Annual Monitor, 18493640New indexed records collection (Some Restrictions May Apply)United StatesArizona Deaths, 1870-195112,2340Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesArizona, Birth Certificates and Indexes, 1855-1930272,8510Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesArkansas, County Voter Registration Records, 1868-191055,2470New indexed records collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-199496,6350Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Geographical and Name Index of Californians who served in WWI, 1914-191827,3060New indexed records collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, index to San Francisco passenger lists, 1893-1934395,7400New indexed records collection United StatesCalifornia, Los Angeles Passenger Lists, 1907-1948194,1530Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesCalifornia, Los Angeles, Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery/Crematory Records, 1884-20028,8670Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Los Angeles, Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery, Deceased Card File Index, 1877-19892,5380Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesCalifornia, Los Angeles, San Gabriel Cemetery Association, Cemetery Index 1872-200322,6220New indexed records collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, passenger and crew lists at various ports, 1907-1956199,9150New indexed records collection United StatesCalifornia, San Benito County Registrar, Burial Permits 1911-19484290Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, San Mateo County, Colma, Italian Cemetery Records, 1899-201172,8300Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesDistrict of Columbia Deaths, 1874-19616150Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesFlorida, Fort Lauderdale Crew Lists, 1939-1945130Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesFlorida, Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at St. Petersburg, Florida, 1926-194130Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesFlorida, Pensacola, Passenger Lists, 1900-19458450Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Chatham, Savannah, Laurel Grove Cemetery Record Keeper’s Book (colored), 1852-19425,5710Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Columbus, Linwood and Porterdale Colored Cemeteries, Interment Records, 1866-200014,4120Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, County Voter Registrations, 1856-1909140Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Headright and Bounty Land Records, 1783-190965,0010Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Savannah City Jail Registers, 1855-1873500Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesHawaii island census records, 1878-189649,4410New indexed records collectionUnited StatesHawaii State Archives, Register of Voters, Hawaiian Islands, 1887-188814,6690New indexed records collectionUnited StatesHawaii, Collector of Customs, Ships’ Passenger Manifests, 1843-190065,2910New indexed records collectionUnited StatesHawaii, Hawaiian Islands Newspaper Obituaries, 1900-ca.20105,4680Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesIdaho, Jefferson Star, County Cemetery Records, 1800-2000126,3500Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesIdaho, Twin Falls County, Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery, Cemetery Records, 1937-19937,1230Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesIndiana, Bartholomew, Columbus, Garland Brook Cemetery Interment Records, ca.1885-ca.200016,2120New indexed records collectionUnited StatesIowa, Buchanan County Obituaries and Cemetery Records, ca.1796-1988126,2030Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesIowa, Historical Society of Iowa, Divorce Records, 1906-1937118,2430New indexed records collectionUnited StatesIowa, Marshall County, Marshalltown, Riverside Cemetery Burial Records, ca.1800-ca.19754,1410Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesIowa, Tama County, Tax Records, 1865-19392000Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana Confederate Pensions, 1898-19507540Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana, Orleans and St. Tammany Parish, Voter Registration Records, 1867-1905130Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana, Orleans Parish Death Records and Certificates, 1835-1954213,2820Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMaine, Alien Arrivals, 1906-1953199,0100New indexed records collectionUnited StatesMichigan, Detroit Manifests of Arrivals at the Port of Detroit, 1906-1954323,1210Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMichigan, Saginaw County, Biographical Card File, ca. 1830-200013,2140New indexed records collectionUnited StatesMinnesota Passenger and Crew Lists, 1912-195620,1970Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMinnesota, Hennepin County, Minneapolis, Layman Cemetery Burial Records, 1860-192623,4250New indexed records collectionUnited StatesMississippi, County Marriages, 1858-197958,0020Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesMississippi, Death Certificate Index, 1912-19434,2510Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMissouri State and Territorial Census Records, 1732-193334,5010Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMontana, Silver Bow County, Cemetery Indexes, 1880-200374,1790Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNebraska, Lancaster County, Wyuka Cemetery Burial Permits, 1883-199932,9310Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNebraska, Naturalization Records, 1855-19895540Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesNew Jersey, Mercer County, Veteran’s Service Office, Grave Registration Records, ca. 1770-ca.197928,0280New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Newark, Mount Olivet Cemetery Records, 1871-19845850Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Newark, Woodland Cemetery Records, 1895-198048,2270New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNew Mexico Alien Arrivals, 1917-195417,2400New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNew York, County Naturalization Records, 1791-198060,6060Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNew York, Lackawanna, Holy Cross Cemetery Records, 1855-196548,8860New indexed records collection United StatesNew York, Northern Arrival Manifests, 1902-1956328,4950Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNew York, Southern District, U.S District Court Naturalization Records, 1824-1946103,0000Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNorth Carolina, Center for Health Statistics, Vital Records Unit, County Birth Records, 1913-192289,2600Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesNorth Carolina, Voter Registration Records, 1868-189880Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNorth Carolina, Wilmington, Cemetery Records, 1852-200525,6670Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOhio, Cincinnati, Vine Street Hill Cemetery Index of Burials, 1851-1986200Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOhio, County Naturalization Records, 1800-19771380Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOhio, Toledo, Historic Woodlawn Cemetery Index of Burials, 1877-195565,9180Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOhio, WWI Index and Return Cards, 1916-1920170Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOklahoma, Tulsa County, Rose Hill Memorial Park Interment Records, ca.1915 – ca.198226,1440Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOregon Death Index, 1971-20081,063,0540New indexed records collectionUnited StatesOregon Divorce Index, 1991-2008340,2890New indexed records collectionUnited StatesPennsylvania Cemetery Records, ca. 1700-ca. 19503,8530New indexed records collection United StatesPennsylvania Mortality Schedules, 1850-188017,6630Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesPennsylvania, Eastern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1795-19311430Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesPennsylvania, Schuylkill County, Schuylkill Haven, Funeral Home Obituary Cards, 1914-20076,8560Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesRhode Island, Providence County, Providence, Swan Point Cemetery Records, ca.1846-ca.195027,5230Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesSouth Carolina, County Marriage Licenses, 1911-195187,8930Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesSouth Dakota, Grave Registration Records, 1940-19412430Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesSouth Dakota, Veteran Graves Registration Records, 1940-19419560Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesTexas, Grimes County, Marriage Records, 1951-19662,0030New indexed records collectionUnited StatesUnited States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-19683030Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States Public Records, 1970-200910Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some Restrictions May Apply)United StatesUnited States, GenealogyBank Historical Newspaper Obituaries, 1815-20113,792,5490Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States, New York Land Records, 1630-19753,868,7770Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States, Slave Birth Records, 1780-18463,0350New indexed records collection United StatesUtah, Brigham City Family History Center, Obituary Collection, 1930-201551,5350Added indexed records to an existing collection United StatesUtah, World War I Army Servicemen Records Abstracts, 1914-191820Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesVermont Vital Records, 1760-19543600Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesVirginia, Bureau of Vital Statistics, County Marriage Registers, 1853-193519,6150Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesVirginia, Southern Claims Commission Approved Claims, 1871-1880440Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesWisconsin, Milwaukee, Holy Cross Cemetery, Interment Records, 1909-1979145,1830New indexed records collectionVenezuelaVenezuela, Archdiocese of Valencia, Catholic Church Records, 1760, 1905-2013306,3920Added indexed records to an existing collection VenezuelaVenezuela, Catholic Church Records, 1577-199552,228 0Added indexed records to an existing collection

1930s Fashion: Women’s, Men’s, and Children’s Clothing, 1930–1939

Fri, 05/29/2020 - 10:15

The Great Depression and World War II bookended the 1930s, but fashion flourished anyway during this decade. Glamorous Hollywood screen stars inspired new looks for women, men, and even children. Inexpensive fabrics, affordable catalog clothing, and homespun ingenuity let anyone copy styles previously worn by the wealthy. Here’s a quick look at 1930s fashion.

View 1930s Fashion Gallery 1930s Fashion for Women

The young, boyish silhouette of 1920s women evolved into a conservative, sophisticated shape in the 1930s. The ideal, popular profile was tall and thin, with strong shoulders and slim hips.

Women’s Dresses

At home or in public, women most commonly wore dresses with wide shoulders; puffy sleeves; modest necklines; higher, belted waistlines; and mid-calf flared hemlines. Frilly bows, ruffles, buttons, and other details often decorated dresses.

Housewives wore practical house dresses at home, often homemade from colorful printed cotton (including flour and feed sack fabric). A clever version was the “Hooverette” house dress, a reversible wrap style. Day dresses for wearing in public were more tailored and elegant, often made from silk or rayon crepe. Some women wore blouses with skirts.

Formal dresses most dramatically displayed the decade’s willowy, elegant silhouette. Evening gowns in fluid fabrics were cut on the bias to create flowing, figure-hugging lines that reached the floor. Popular fabrics included satin, rayon, and chiffon.

Women’s Trousers and Active Wear

Hollywood screen stars Katherine Hepburn and Marlene Dietrich helped introduce women’s trousers for sports and leisure. These trousers were wide-legged and high-waisted, often styled like sailors’ pants. Women wore baggier, casual lounge pants on vacation and at the beach. The modern swimsuit came of age during the 1930s, as lighter-weight, rubberized fabrics replaced heavier wool suits.

Women’s Hairstyles and Accessories

In the 1930s, women copied the hairstyles and accessories they saw on popular, glamorous film stars. Short, curly styles dominated, such as the sleek Marcel wave (first popularized in the 1920s). Toward the end of the decade, the more classic 1940s medium-length “middy” style started coming into fashion.

Women often accessorized with inexpensive costume jewelry, gloves, silk scarves, and furs. Smaller hats were popular, such as berets, Greta Garbo-style slouch hats, or knit caps. Turbans topped fancier looks. Two-tone oxford shoes and strappy dress shoes with high, chunky heels were the shoes of choice. It was common to match accessories such as shoes, handbag, and hat.

1930s Fashion for Men

The male silhouette had wide, padded shoulders, a broad chest, defined waist, and straight legs. The overall trend was looser and a little more casual.

Men’s Suits

Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor, was a famous 1930s fashion icon. He popularized the English drape suit, which became popular all over the world. In contrast to the rigid, militaristic cut of men’s suits of his day, Edward wore jackets that were softer in the shoulder, with a vertical drape over a fuller chest. Other trendsetters included film stars Clark Gable and Gary Cooper.

Suits of the 1930s typically had high waists and slightly tapered, creased trousers with turned-up cuffs. Younger men preferred baggier trousers and longer jackets. Suits were darker blue, brown, or gray for cooler weather, with lighter tones for warm weather. Bold patterns included stripes, checks, and plaids.

A vest, pocket handkerchief, shorter tie, hat (such as a fedora or bowler), and dark or two-toned leather dress shoes completed the look.

Men’s Work and Leisure Clothing

Daily wardrobes of laboring men paid little heed to fashion trends. They often wore bib overalls or coveralls of sturdy denim or duck cloth. Work shirts were loose-fitting and long-sleeved. Work uniforms often paired lighter-weight, colored shirts with matching trousers. Heavy leather work boots protected the feet.

Some men wore sports jackets for leisure; in the United States, men also wore them to work. Knitted sweaters, soft-collared shirts, and flannel trousers were also donned for sports and relaxation. Men typically wore one-piece wool swimsuits, but the 30s decade also saw the first men’s swimming trunks.

What Did Children Wear in the 1930s?

Many children wore homemade clothing or items purchased from mail-order catalogs. During the Great Depression, mothers often remade children’s clothing from other items, including flour and feed sacks. These items would have been unique and perhaps well-worn, but many were styled after prevailing trends.

The frilly dresses worn by young, popular film star Shirley Temple and Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret in the United Kingdom set the tone for girls’ clothing. Embellished, puffy-sleeved dresses sported rounded Peter Pan collars. Hemlines were high for younger girls and dropped below the knee for older girls. Dark “Mary Jane” dress shoes topped ankle-high white socks.

Boys’ trouser hemlines also dropped as they got older. Younger boys donned sailor suits or “buster suits,” which paired shorts with long-sleeve, button-down shirts. Older boys wore trousers or flannel suits with button-down shirts and ties, sometimes with a knitted sweater or sweater vest.

Fashion in Your Family History

What did your relatives wear in the 1930s? Look for photos of them in the free, crowdsourced collections of FamilySearch Memories. Or upload your own family photos to share memories of your loved ones—and of what they wore.

View 1910s Fashion Gallery View 1940s Fashion Gallery

Updates to Temple Ordinance Reservations

Tue, 05/26/2020 - 17:00

Great blessings come from providing temple ordinances for our kindred dead. What follows are important updates to some of the tools, resources, and processes being developed to hasten this important, eternal work.

We hope these adjustments will make it simpler and easier for Church members to participate in family history and temple service, as well as share the joy that comes from serving ancestors. Watch this post for continued updates to temple ordinance reservations. 

Coming Soon: Request Shared Names Using the Family Tree or Ordinances Ready

In addition to the Ordinances Ready feature, ordinance reservations that have been shared with the temple will soon be available for request through the FamilySearch Family Tree.

When you share a family name with the temple, the shared name is made available to temple patrons who do not have their own family names and also to family members who wish to request the shared name.

Coming Soon: Simplified Temple Reservation Lists

The Temple menu on FamilySearch.org is being updated. With this update, you will be able to more easily see the ordinances you have reserved and those you have shared with others or with the temple.

With this update, when you go to FamilySearch.org and click Temple, a new menu will show on the left side of the screen.

In the menu, you will be able to click My Reservations to see a complete list of ordinance reservations that are under your name.

To see the reservations you have shared with friends, family members, or the temple, click Shared.

The filter option at the top of both reservation lists will allow you to filter the list in various ways. The filters allow you to easily see which reservations have been printed and which remain unprinted. You can also filter by the type of ordinance.

Coming Soon: Fewer Temple Icon Colors

The colors for temple icons in the Family Tree are being simplified to make it easier for people to identify family names and reserve ordinances in the Family Tree. Instead of 9 colors to show the status of a reservation, 4 colors will soon be used.

As shown in the example below, a grey icon will indicate that a reservation has been completed, while a blue icon will indicate that it is in progress. Green icons will show that a reservation can be requested and orange will indicate that an ordinance cannot be requested at this time.

Additional information about a reservation, such as whether it has been printed, shared with the temple, and so on, will be shown as text next to the icon.

Update: July 29, 2019—Ordinances Ready: A Convenient Way to Find Ordinance Reservations

Ordinances Ready is an automated service that searches FamilySearch.org and the temple reservation list to identify ancestors needing temple ordinances. For more information about Ordinances Ready, see this recent blog post.

This service is now available on FamilySearch.org as well as in the Family Tree mobile app. This availability means that you can find temple ordinances using your own computer, phone, or other devices when you are planning to go to the temple.

Update: July 29, 2019—Expiration of Ordinance Reservations

When temple reservations expire, they are automatically shared with the temple and made available to other relatives through Family Tree and Ordinances Ready. A few changes to how expiration dates work are explained below.

Expiration Dates 
  • In general, ordinance reservations expire two years from the reservation date. 
  • Ordinance reservations you share with someone expire two years from the original reservation date. 
  • Ordinance reservations expire after 90 days if they were retrieved from the temple reservation list by Ordinances Ready. (Learn more about Ordinances Ready and how it searches for ordinances.)
  • When you reserve multiple ordinances for the same ancestor, the ordinance reservation will be extended for one year if at least one ordinance is completed before the expiration date. 
Expiration Notifications 

Your reservation list now shows an expiration date. Patrons will be notified of expiring reservations through the FamilySearch messaging system and eventually through email notifications (if an email address has been added).

Update: July 29, 2019—Date Required to Reserve Temple Ordinances

Ordinance reservations require a date for at least one of the vital events of the person’s life (such as a birth, death, or marriage).

Family Tree uses these dates—exact or estimated—to determine whether 110 years have passed since the person’s birth. (Learn more about the 110-year rule and whom you can reserve ordinances for.)

Your reservation list may not print cards for ordinance reservations with a missing date. Click here for help with estimating dates and entering them into FamilySearch Family Tree.

Update: July 29, 2019—Easier Ways to Print Ordinance Reservation Cards

You can now use your phone in the temple office to print ordinance reservation cards using a QR code or ID number found in the Family Tree app.

Cell phones and electronic devices will be allowed in the temple office so temple workers can assist you. All the temple worker needs is the QR code or ID number for your reservation. For help finding the QR code on a phone, computer, or mobile device, follow the instructions in this article.

Please remember to turn off your cell phone after visiting the temple office and to use electronic devices respectfully in the temple.

Finding United States Military Service Records

Sat, 05/23/2020 - 10:00

If you have United States ancestry, it is possible that you have an ancestor or ancestors who served in the United States military. Military records from the Revolutionary War to more recent conflicts contain important information for your family’s history.

These records can tell you who among your ancestors served in the military and when they served. They can also give information about their family, what family members looked like, stories from their service, and more. The best part? Many of these records are available for you to search online!

Tips on Searching United States Military Records

When you search military records, it’s helpful to have as much information about your ancestor as you can gather. The name of your ancestors, their birth year and residences, and the names of wars they may have served in can all help your search. As you find military records, keep an eye out for the name of the military unit, commanding officer, rank, dates of enlistment, and discharge or date of death. This information will help identify your ancestor in additional records and create a timeline of military service.

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Records You May Encounter as You Search

There are many different types of military records, and each can provide a peek into your ancestor’s military service. Records can be divided into two categories: those created before and during service and those created after service. If you’re new to searching military records, knowing a little about each type can help your search.

Below are three examples of different kinds of military records you may find as you search for your ancestors.

Draft Registrations

Draft registrations are especially important in family history research for World War I (1917–1918) and World War II (1940–1945). In World War I, 24 million men registered, and in World War II, 50 million registered. Most of those serving in uniform were inducted or drafted. One thing to keep in mind is that not everyone who registered was actually drafted. Additional research will be needed to determine if there was military service.

Note that there was also a draft during the Civil War for the Union Army. Those enrollment records are at the National Archives and have been published on Ancestry.com.

Related Wiki Article

Pension Files

When a soldier died in battle, a dependent such as a wife or elderly parent would often apply for a pension. The information required for these applications—such as a date of marriage and the names of minor children—make them a wealth of information.

Pension records are usually the best military record for family information if the soldier or veteran was deceased. Most other military records have only information about the soldier.

Related Wiki Article

Cemetery Records

Cemetery records include applications for headstones, which were supplied at government expense. They also include interment or burial records at national cemeteries and state veteran cemeteries. For soldiers buried overseas, the American Battle Monuments Commission has an online searchable database.

FamilySearch has two main record collections for military cemetery records. One is for the period 1925–1949, and the other is for 1879–1903.

Related Wiki Article

Finding United States Military Records

Most United States military records can be found online, at historical societies, or ordered from national or state archives. However, note that United States military records have a 62-year rule; records from less that 62 years ago are not available to the public. If you are looking for information on a recently deceased ancestor, know ahead of time that what you receive may be limited. Unless you are the spouse, parent, child, or sibling of the veteran, then you won’t be granted full access to the entire military record. However, what you find can still be very helpful!

Military records have a unique quality that sets them apart from other historical records. These documents represent the heavy sacrifices your ancestors made on behalf of their country. What better way to honor that sacrifice than by learning more about these ancestors and carrying their legacy forward?

Interested in Learning More?

For more information, head to the following wiki articles:

Annelie Hansen and Ken Nelson contributed to this article.

1940s Fashion: Women’s and Men’s Clothing Worn, 1940–1950

Wed, 05/20/2020 - 15:11

World War II dominated the first half of the 1940s as well as fashions in the Western world. Materials such as silk, nylon, wool, leather, rubber, and zippers were needed in wartime production. Clothing was rationed in the United States and parts of Europe. 1940s fashion designers had to be efficient and innovative in how they made suits, dresses, and shoes.

View 1940s Fashion Gallery The Effect of War on Fashion

Millions of people dressed differently during the war. Men and women wore military uniforms. Many women donned laborer’s clothing, such as coveralls or trousers. In many situations, people had to make do with older or repurposed clothing rather than purchasing new styles and designs. Because of shortages and regulations, wealthier and poorer people were more likely to be dressed similarly.

However, the war caused greater regional variety in clothing styles. Paris, the longtime center of Western fashion, was cut off during the German occupation. Designers in other places gained more influence in their own countries. In several countries, laws regulated the garment industry, and manufacturers had less ability to distribute internationally.

1940s Fashion for Women Popular Dress Styles in the 1940s

The typical 1940s female dress silhouette was like a uniform: simple and fitted, with boxy shoulders, a slim-belted waistline, and a hemline below the knee. The style shown here is for a utility dress from the United Kingdom that could be purchased with ration coupons. In cold weather, you might see women in long-sleeved dress suits of a similar shape.

In the United States, designer Claire McCardell popularized sporty, comfortable dresses that were a little roomier, including the popular popover wrap dress. She used casual fabrics such as denim, as well as more colorful and playful seersucker and jersey fabrics. Rayon became a popular, inexpensive dress fabric too.

In Germany, women’s fashions were restricted during the war. The German Fashion Board encouraged women to wear traditional dirndl dresses made by German designers. Women were told not to wear makeup, trousers, furs, perfume, or glamorous clothing.

After World War II, French designer Christian Dior launched what became known as the “New Look.” His style rounded the shoulders and emphasized hips with a full, pleated skirt. The hemline dropped to mid-calf or lower. These changes celebrated the end of rationing and hinted at the return of women to domestic life. Despite some criticism, the New Look remained popular into the 1950s.

Women’s Pant Styles

At the beginning of the 1940s, Western women did not commonly wear trousers in public, except as active wear. But as they wore them from necessity, many women came to appreciate their comfort and practicality. A shortage of stockings (traditionally worn under dresses) gave women another reason to choose trousers.

Women’s dress pants during this decade were wide-legged and high-waisted, worn with tucked-in blouses or as pantsuits with matching tops. After the war, dresses again dominated women’s fashion. But pants had found a permanent place in the hearts—and wardrobes—of many women.

Women’s Hairstyles, Hats, and Accessories

Women in the 1940s typically wore their hair shoulder-length or longer, without bangs, styled with waves and rolls. The “victory roll” helped women manage long hairstyles during a hard day’s work; they could unroll it later into shapely waves. Women also wore turbans and head scarves, both to keep hair out of the way while working and because scarcity of hair-care products made it difficult to maintain polished styles.

Women’s hats and other accessories weren’t subject to much regulation during the war. Many had patriotic or military styling. Some hats were small and simple. Others used accessories to add colorful or feminine touches to the more utilitarian look of rationed clothing.

1940s Fashion for Men Men’s Suits

During the 1940s, men not in uniform often wore suits in public. Many made do with older suits from the 1930s. Suit vests fell out of favor as an excess use of fabric. New suits were made with a wool-rayon blend instead of wool and often with patterned (especially striped) fabric.

In the United Kingdom, single-breasted suits replaced double-breasted suits to preserve labor and materials. Suits and shirts were made with fewer pockets and narrower lapels. Trousers weren’t allowed to have cuffs, though this style proved unpopular, and many men purchased a size too long and had them altered.

In the United States, the “Victory Suit” followed similar specifications, but the rules (and the suits) were a little looser. The baggy, colorful “zoot suit,” popularized by jazz culture in the 1930s, became popular with some young Italian and Mexican immigrants, despite restrictions against making them. Some perceived zoot suits as unpatriotic.

When the war ended, baggier suits and double-breasted jackets with wider lapels became popular again. In the United States, returning soldiers enjoyed the “Bold Look” fashion: suits and ties with bolder colors and louder patterns and sports jackets in contrasting colors.

Men’s Hats

A well-styled man of 1940s fashion wore a hat, though hats became less popular among younger men and after the war. Hats were most commonly made of felt. The fedora was a popular style and was often worn on an angle. A more formal variety was the homburg hat. In the summer, men might don a wide-brimmed straw hat in a variety of shapes, such as a fedora, pork pie, Panama, or boater. For active leisure, men might don a flat cap (what we think of today as newsboy style).

Fashion in Your Family History

What did your relatives wear in the 1940s? You may be able to find pictures of them in FamilySearch Memories, a free, crowdsourced collection of family photos. Or upload your own family photos to share memories of your loved ones with others who may be related to you.

View 1910s Fashion Gallery View 1930s Fashion Gallery

Connect While Social Distancing: Join the FamilySearch Live Community

Tue, 05/19/2020 - 07:56

“We wish you peace and joy as you connect with those closest to you. We remain committed to helping you discover your story.” —Steve Rockwood, FamilySearch CEO

We at FamilySearch are excited to share an upcoming new live social media series. This series will be an opportunity for the family history community to connect virtually and interact while many are practicing social distancing, quarantining, or even self-isolating.

Event Schedule

Instagram live events are scheduled for each Tuesday and Thursday at 11:00 a.m. mountain time. A Facebook live event will happen each Wednesday at the 4:00 p.m. (also mountain time) while we endure the social limitations relating to COVID-19.

You can learn more about the week’s topics and guests below.

FamilySearch Instagram Live Add to Google Calendar

When: Tuesday, June 9, at 11 a.m. (mountain time)

Topic: Collaborative Family Journaling

Who: Rebecca Cooper | Simple as That

FamilySearch Facebook Live

When: Wednesday, June 10, at 4 p.m. (mountain time)

Topic: Behind the Scenes with the Research Team of Relative Race

Who: Tristan Tolman | Relative Race

FamilySearch Facebook LiveSpanish

When: Thursday, June 11, TBD

Topic: TBD

Who: TBD

FamilySearch Instagram Live Add to Google Calendar

When: Thursday, June 11, at 11 a.m. (mountain time)

Topic: Food Heritage

Who: Brad, Heather, and Candace | Orson Gygi

Past Live Events

If you haven’t had a chance to watch past live events but want to, check out our YouTube playlist featuring some of the social lives. You can also watch a couple of the past live events below!

Why a Social Media Series?

“Our stories matter. They are one of the richest parts of family history. Sharing these stories can provide comfort to us and to future generations as they face their own struggles.” —Steve Rockwood

Family history is for everyone, every day. It is just as important for us to take part fully in recording our stories as it is to discover those people who came before us. This evolving series is meant to help you do both of those things.

What Will the Series Include?

The series will include questions and answers, beginner how-tos, record helps, FamilySearch and Family Tree app tips, family stories, and more! We hope that in creating this series, we will be able to help you find quick ways to stay involved with family history without adding any burden.

We want to point out ways that you are already succeeding and give a few tips along the way that can help you make the most of this unprecedented time. We hope to help you find new ways to record YOUR story, find inspiring stories of others in your family tree, and share inspiring and encouraging messages along the way.

How Can I Participate?

Follow us on Instagram @FamilySearch and on Facebook (facebook.com/FamilySearch/) to receive notifications and reminders. Share your thoughts and experience with the series by using the hashtag #FamilySearchLive when you post!

Also, be sure to let us know in the comments how we can help you during this time. We would especially like to hear your responses to these sorts of questions: 

●      We are here to support you. What questions do you have for us?

●      How can we help you while you are home?

●      What would you like to learn during this unprecedented time?

●      What questions do you have about the Family Tree or Memories apps?

How to View an Instagram Live

To view the Instagram Live, follow these steps.

On mobile: 

  1. Open the Instagram app and go to the FamilySearch page. You can find the FamilySearch page by clicking on the magnifying glass icon (bottom-left corner) and typing “FamilySearch” into the search bar that appears.
  2. Once at the FamilySearch page, click on the FamilySearch profile picture in the top-left corner to view current or past Instagram Lives for up to 24 hours after the stream. (If given the option to view the story or live, select live.)
  3. Alternatively, you can view current or past Instagram Lives by tapping on the IGTV icon (a square TV with a squiggle through the center), which you can find below the profile description and above the Instagram feed.

On Desktop:

(Note: You can only view live Instagram streams on the mobile app, but the recordings will be uploaded and available via desktop. To access them, follow the instructions below.)

  1. Go to Instagram.com and then use the search-bar at the top of the screen to go to the FamilySearch page.
  2. Similar to mobile, either click on the profile picture or select the IGTV icon to watch past Instagram Lives.
How to View a Facebook Live

There are a few different ways to access a Facebook Live event.

The easiest way is to go to facebook.com/familysearch/live/. From there, you can view all previous FamilySearch Live events, including any that are currently live.

If you’re following the FamilySearch page on Facebook, you can also access live events your Facebook timeline. Live videos often show up as one of the posts on the timeline. Facebook may also send you a notification reminder when FamilySearch goes live. You can view the video by clicking on that notification. 

You can also navigate to the live video by clicking the Watch section on the left hand side of the FamilySearch Facebook page‘s screen, and then selecting Live.

We hope to grow along with you in innovative ways as we discover, gather, and connect wherever we may be. We are grateful for the technology we have that makes such discoveries and connections possible in almost every circumstance. 

Don’t forget to share your experience with the live streams in the comments below!

How to Find Ancestors in Need of Temple Work in the Family Tree

Sat, 05/16/2020 - 17:30

Performing temple ordinances for family can be a joyful experience! And today, it’s easier than ever to find your deceased family members who are in need of temple work. It is something that is doable and that will bless your life.

In the April 2018 general conference, President Russell M. Nelson pled with us to “choose to do the spiritual work required to enjoy the gift of the Holy Ghost and hear the voice of the Spirit more frequently and more clearly.” He also provided a formula to receive personal revelation. He said, “Nothing opens the heavens quite like the combination of increased purity, exact obedience, earnest seeking, daily feasting on the words of Christ in the Book of Mormon, and regular time committed to temple and family history work.

Family history is a great way to follow the prophet’s counsel to receive revelation. The Spirit can guide you to know where to work on your family lines. He can help you find missing family members and even avoid mistakes. As you rely on the Spirit in doing family history, you will be more able to hear and follow the Spirit in all areas of life.

Here are some practical approaches anyone can use to find deceased ancestors in the FamilySearch Family Tree, from beginners to those with more family history experience.

Ordinances Ready

You may be aware of Ordinances Ready, which is available on FamilySearch.org and the Family Tree mobile app. Ordinances Ready searches Family Tree for the names of deceased family members you can take to the temple. Ordinances Ready may be a good resource if you are just starting your family history and want a family experience in the temple.

You may even be able to do some research on people found through Ordinances Ready to find missing family members and do the work for them (see “Help Build the Family Tree” below). More information on Ordinances Ready is available here.

Green Temples and Temple Tasks

Sometimes you may see a name with a green temple in Family Tree. Or you may see green temples in the Recommended Tasks section of your FamilySearch.org home page or when using Helper Resources to help someone else. What should you do?

In addition to following the direction of the Spirit, it helps to do some basic checks to learn a little more about the person:

  • Does the person have a full name, including a surname?
  • Does the information in the Vitals section of the person’s profile look reasonable?
  • Do the family relationships look reasonable?

If something feels off or looks questionable (such as a person christened before birth, or someone with three sets of parents), it’s a good idea to do more checking before performing temple ordinances. Your temple and family history consultant may be able to help.

Help Build the Family Tree

As of 2019, there were 1.24 billion people in Family Tree. But how many people have ever lived on the earth? Estimates vary, but it’s probably somewhere around 110 billion. That means about 109 billion people are missing from Family Tree!

Every method we’ve talked about so far looks for ancestors who are already in Family Tree. But how would you like to find one of those 109 billion missing people? You could try using record hints; sometimes historical records for one person contain information about other family members. For example, a person’s birth record probably lists his or her parents.

But what if there are no record hints for someone? Perhaps the first thing to check is that your family members are in the tree at all. Draw from your own knowledge of your family; ensure that you have added parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts, and uncles to the tree.

Make sure to include all the information you know about your family! Adding this information may even generate the record hints you need.

Here’s another simple approach you can use.

  1. Pray for guidance; then look at your fan chart, and follow promptings about which family to focus on.
  2. As you do, keep in mind a few commonsense guidelines:
    • Choose a country where you are comfortable with the language. If your family comes from a country with a language you don’t speak, the FamilySearch wiki has lists of genealogical terms in various languages.
    • Focus on people born in the 1800s and early 1900s (records in this period are generally easiest to find and read).
  3. After deciding on a family, look for people without spouses or couples with few or no children.
  4. Check in FamilySearch Historical Records or on partner sites to find records with information about the spouses or children of these people.

You can find more information about these steps in this presentation.

Once you’ve found a missing person, the next step is to add the person to Family Tree.

Preparing Family Members’ Names for the Temple

After you have added someone to Family Tree, follow these instructions to reserve the person’s temple ordinances. You can also find answers to frequently asked questions in this blog post.

Be Part of the Gathering

We live in an amazing time. We’ve never had so many resources to help us find deceased family members to take to the temple. In addition, our prophet has invited us to make a greater effort to follow the Spirit. Doing family history is a great way to accept that invitation. Whether you want to start your family history or get more involved, this is the time! You can join the effort to gather Israel on both sides of the veil.

How to Find Russian Military Records from World War II

Wed, 05/13/2020 - 13:59

World War II, also referred to as the Great Patriotic War in Russia, began in 1941 and ended in 1945. Some argue that the Russian people were the hardest hit in the way of the total number of casualties. Have you ever wondered if you had ancestors who were part of the Russian forces during World War II? Here are some first-steps in how to find World War II Russian military records for your family history.

A Quick Look at Soviet Forces during World War II

Though the official number of those who served or died is difficult to calculate, one estimate long believed to be fairly accurate was that there were between 20 and 27 million Russian civilian and military casualties. However, in recent years, Russian scholars have put that number to over 40 million.

According to an analysis of S. N. Mikhalev in 2000, the Russian Army and Navy was about 4.7 million strong at the beginning of the war. About 29.5 million persons were drafted during the war and about 9.6 million were discharged. By the time the Great Patriotic War ended in 1945, the Russian Army and Navy were about 12 million strong. This number included active service personnel, those in hospitals, and civilian departments.

Finding World War II Russian Military Records—Where to Start

As genealogists, we know that the best place to start any research project is with living relatives. You can ask living relatives about ancestors who may have fought in Russian forces during World War II.

(Learn how to conduct a personal interview.)

Russian World War II Records Found Online Pobediteli

A wonderful resource was created several years ago to show appreciation to Russian World War II veterans who were alive for the 60th anniversary of the victory. In this initiative, World War II veterans living at that time (2005) were interviewed, and a great amount of valuable information was recorded. Anyone can see the collection of information at Pobediteli.

The Pobediteli database of World War II veteran soldiers gives the full name, birth date, and residential region of the veteran. Users can search Pobediteli in English or Russian.

Memory Road

Another helpful website database is Memory Road. The Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation created this website to collect pictures of World War II Soviet Army veterans. As of today, this resource has over 350,000 pictures.

Memory of the People

Each veteran’s picture is linked to a Memory of the People database that gives the veteran’s name, birth date and place, rank, and a list of awards.

Speaking of Memory of the People, this helpful website offers even more. It has over 70 million records including the following:

  • 18 million service records
  • 1.3 million award records
  • 900,000 records on those killed in action

Memory of the People can be translated into English via your browser (here’s the Chrome tutorial). When using the search function on the website, you will have better results if you use the Russian word and spelling when searching with the names of ancestors. For example, the popular Russian surname “Иванов” gives over 950,000 results, but the English equivalent, “Ivanov,” brings up no results.

Memorial

Lastly, more than 5 million Russian World War II records can be found at the Memorial website. This website contains databases of records pertaining to Russian and Soviet soldiers who died, went missing, or became prisoners of war during World War II.

Records found at Memorial may include information such as the soldier’s full name, birth date or year, date and place of recruitment, last place of service, military rank, and reason for discharge.

This website is in Russian, but you can use Google Translate to assist you in your research.

Your ancestors’ stories may be hard to find if you live far removed from their homelands, but with these websites, you may be able to find just what you are looking for.

For additional help and resources, see the following:

7 Journal Ideas to Help You Record Your Story

Tue, 05/12/2020 - 18:00

We live in momentous times! As we experience what life brings, keeping a record of our activities and current events will help us, as well as our descendants, understand our experiences. These days, the ways to keep a journal have increased dramatically. Consider some of the following journal ideas, and try one for yourself!

1. Paper Journals—A Conventional Method

If you prefer a more traditional journaling experience, use a regular journal or notebook to write down your story. Even if you write just one or two sentences at a time, your contributions will make a difference to your descendants and to your personal well-being.

You could also include calendars, to-do lists, newspaper clippings, and snippets from letters and emails to add interest—almost like a scrapbook! Keep mementos from special occasions, such as tickets from concerts or plays. Not only will these mementos make your journal vibrant, but the artifacts along with a few sentences about the event will keep your memories fresh!

2. Digital Journaling: A Journal on the Go

A journal doesn’t just have to be pen and paper—thanks to mobile devices, your journal can always be in in your pocket. One advantage of keeping a digital journal is that you can journal on the go, chronicling events as they happen using either your cell phone or laptop.

Digital journaling can be as simple as opening a document and writing your thoughts. Consider adding lists, lessons learned, goals, and photos to make your journal come to life. You can also make specialized journals that focus on one topic, such as a gratitude journal or a travel journal.

Be sure to back up and save your files regularly and print them occasionally. These steps will prevent your journal from being lost.

Digital journal apps are available that allow you to add weather and location information, recordings, videos, and other features. Try using goal tracking apps, blogs, and social media accounts to keep a record of your life. Be creative and have fun; the possibilities of making a digital journal unique to you are endless.

3. Geo-Journaling: Where Do You Go, and What Do You Like to Do?

Studies show that the rising generation often relates more to experiences than they do to physical items. If you like to hike, bike, walk, or jog, try recording your experiences. Keeping a geo-journal is a journal idea that will keep you active and help you preserve treasured memories!

Experts believe that tracking these events and leaving them behind for future generations to recreate enables you to create a stronger bond than would come from someone simply reading your words.

As your family members go to the same places you went, read your words, and see your photos, they will have a powerful connection with you that can’t be had in any other way. You can share these activities on social media apps you are already using in a way that encourages others to go and do what you did. You might even consider retracing your ancestors’ travels and writing about your experiences.

4. Photo Journals: A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

There are dozens of ways to keep a photo journal—and, as always, the best way is the way that works for you! Using a traditional photo album is one method; creating a printed photo book is another. You can also make a digital photo journal by making online albums! The best part? Everything you need is on your phone.

Digital photography makes it easy to keep track of when and where a photo was taken. You can also add a sentence or two to explain the story behind it.

5. Doodle Journals: Combining Words and Drawings

If you enjoy drawing, why not use your doodles as a form of journal keeping? Becky Christensen, a mother and grandmother who teaches school in Japan, enjoys keeping her family up to date with her adventures through her doodle journal.

Sketch important things that happened throughout the day, make little comics of events that happened, or just draw out your thoughts. Whatever you do, make your journal personal and unique to you!

6. Online Journaling Logs: The Possibilities Are Endless

A journal doesn’t necessarily need to use written words. There are dozens of other ways to capture your memories, many of which are made free and easily accessible through the internet. Try making a private Pinterest board or a YouTube playlist that captures small moments in your life.

Don’t be afraid to record the silly things, such as memes or family jokes! Although they may not seem profound, they are important parts of your life that capture your personality, your interests, and a slice of what the world was like during your life!

7. Ancestors’ Journals: Catching a Glimpse of the Past

Do you have an ancestor’s journal in your possession? Read it and find yourself transported back in time. Then learn about the period when it was written to help you understand the context of what was happening. You might just get some journal ideas from the experiences your ancestors share!

Consider digitizing your ancestors’ journals and adding them to FamilySearch Memories to preserve them and to share them with relatives.

However you decide to keep a journal, the important thing is that you record your experiences. Oprah Winfrey once wrote, “Keeping a journal will change your life in ways that you’d never imagine.” Try one of these journal ideas for yourself and for those who come after you.

Some of this articles’ material was taken from Matt Misbach’s class, “Geo Journaling,” at the RootsTech Salt Lake City 2020 Convention.

RootsTech is held annually and has classes for genealogists of all levels. To learn more about RootsTech, visit their website or read this blog article.

Out-of-the-Box Indexing Goals and Activities

Thu, 05/07/2020 - 23:02

Have you ever set a goal to index a certain number of records? Or organized a group around a specific indexing project?

Many indexing groups around the world have made astounding contributions to the searchable records on FamilySearch.org as they have made and reached their indexing goals. But using number goals as an incentive isn’t the only way to index! Every record indexed can help someone somewhere learn about family. No matter how many records you index, your contribution makes a difference.

If indexing is not about the numbers, how do you do indexing as a group? While some group members might be motivated by reaching a numeric indexing goal, group organizers should consider that not everyone will be. For some, numbers can be tedious or intimidating. A reliance on numbers can also create an urgency to index quickly rather than accurately.

What follows are a few fun ideas for getting group members excited about indexing—ideas that don’t rely on charts, graphs, or a number.

Not sure what an indexing group is?

Learn what they are, how to join one, and how to create a group.

1. Share fun or unique things you find.

Historical records are about people, and people are fascinating. Can you find a unique name, an occupation, or an interesting fact inside the record you are indexing? Share with your group via messaging or in a group gathering.

2. Get to know the places on historical records.

Are you indexing a record from Minas Gerais, Brazil or Florence, Italy? Learn about the food, names, culture, or history of these places. You could even hold a themed activity.

3. Work in small support teams.

Have you ever thought an indexing project was intimidating or worried your entries were off? Try working on it with a partner! Have one person type the information while another uses the internet to double-check spellings for names and locations. This group process can increase the quality of the index, and it might help you interpret hard-to-read records.

4. Center your goals on learning something new.

Instead of setting number goals, each person can learn to index a new type of record, a record from another part of the world, and so on. You can brainstorm ideas together and then look at help resources on FamilySearch.org, the FamilySearch Research Wiki, and elsewhere on the internet.

5. Challenge each member of your group to teach someone how to index.

As a group, try teach someone else to index, and then share your experiences. Did anyone new join your group as a result of the challenge? Now that’s a successful activity!

6. Invite group members to share an indexing story.

Indexing stories could be about an inspiring moment while indexing, the story behind how a person got started, or simply about how indexing has brought joy or satisfaction to group members’ day-to-day life. It’s possible that not everyone has something to share, but even a single story might be fun for the whole group to hear.

7. Invite group members to give a mini-lesson on indexing.

This short lesson could be on an indexing technique or something they have learned. Much of what a person knows about indexing can be learned by trial and error. Is there a way to help someone new to indexing avoid these errors?

8. Learn how to index in another language.

If you have group members with experience in another language or who can dedicate time to online learning, indexing in another language could be a fun challenge. Go to the Language Resources page, and choose a language from the drop-down list. Be sure to study these resources and the language carefully to make your entries as accurate as possible.

9. Explore different ways to keep in touch

Social connections can make for a great indexing experience, but what this looks like may be different for every group. Whether you chat via Facebook or WhatsApp, hop on a video call, or text back and forth while indexing, those connections can really make a difference.

Let the Fun Begin

So here’s your challenge. Pick an idea. See how it goes. Spend an evening having fun with indexing and discussing its joys without worrying too much about statistics. Don’t talk about numbers. Talk instead about how indexing makes people feel, and focus on the reasons why each of you loves indexing. Each record you enter is helping someone somewhere get one step closer to family—creating connections that might have been much more difficult without your help.

How Indexing Can Be Useful in Your Calling

Thu, 05/07/2020 - 23:02

Indexing is a service that reaches families worldwide—and it can be done at home or as a group. It helps further the Lord’s work by connecting God’s children with their families, and it can even soften people’s hearts and draw them closer to the Savior. As you serve in your calling, you may want to consider indexing as a means of strengthening and lifting those you serve.  

Isn’t indexing something consultants do?

Yes! Many temple and family history consultants index records and have helped ward members learn to index. In fact, previously there was a calling at the ward level for a temple and family history consultant that specialized in indexing.

With the retirement of that calling, many ward leaders and temple and family history consultants have wondered what place indexing has in wards and stakes.                    

Different Ways Indexing Can Be Used in a Ward or Stake

Don’t worry! Indexing hasn’t gone away. It remains one of many activities that allow ward members to help others discover and gather their family.

Personalized temple and family history experiences

Indexing can be used as part of the family history experiences that ward temple and family history consultants create for others. Some ward members may not feel like they have time or resources to do extensive record searching. Or they may have apparently full trees and don’t feel like there is anything they can contribute. Indexing can be a simple way for them to serve with whatever time they have, and it may even improve their own chances of discovering hard-to-find ancestors.

Ward temple and family history plans

Depending on a ward’s needs, indexing can be a resource or goal in a ward’s temple and family history plan. That isn’t to say that indexing must be part of the plan. It’s simply an option. Leaders and those with temple and family history callings should keep in mind that indexing goals don’t have to be focused on numbers and should never be burdensome.

Group activities for youth, Relief Society, and the elders quorum

As the Lord hastens His work on this earth, prophets and apostles have encouraged members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints of all ages to become more involved in gathering Israel. As youth leaders, Relief Society leaders, and priesthood leaders look for ways to include temple and family history in their regular activities, indexing might be a service activity to consider.

A service idea for individuals

Ward leaders are frequently called upon to provide service ideas that meet a variety of personal challenges and circumstances. While indexing might not be for everyone, it is a service that ward leaders can become familiar with and can recommend to ward members seeking a service activity to do from home. The bishop may also extend the calling of “indexing worker” to individuals where appropriate.

Helping those struggling with life challenges

Indexing has also been used by some people as a means of overcoming addiction and other life challenges. Bishops and elders quorum presidents in particular may want to study some of the emotional and spiritual benefits of indexing and recommend it to those in need.

Blessings Noticed by Others

At FamilySearch, we often hear stories about indexing—how it blesses and strengthens people’s lives. Recently a stake in Mexico made a goal of indexing thousands of records. While members came quite close to achieving their goal, it was the act of serving that really impacted stake members.

“The numbers are not as important as the wonderful spirit that has been in the stake,” the stake president later said. “The youth have left Facebook for indexing, and the family history center has been full—all day, every day.”

The stake president further told of a father in the stake who had not been coming to church. After seeing his daughter index, the father felt inspired to try it himself. Gradually his appearance changed—he seemed happier and more open to the influence of the Holy Ghost.

At one point, the father found his own surname in a batch he was indexing and was overwhelmed by a feeling he couldn’t explain. He continued indexing and discovered that eleven of the people named were his ancestors. The daughter had never seen her father cry before, and so the tears on his face surprised her.  

After hearing the story, the stake president invited the father to prepare himself to go to the temple and perform his ancestors’ ordinances. To the stake president’s great joy, the father accepted.

Although this type of miracle doesn’t happen to everyone who indexes, our Heavenly Father works through small and simple means to bless our efforts and connect us to our family beyond the veil.

How to Learn More about Indexing

Indexing is a simple way to do meaningful service, and temple and family history service continues to bless members of the Church around the world.

If you are interested in learning more about indexing, visit the indexing page on FamilySearch.org. Ward and stake leaders can also reach out to local temple and family history leaders and consultants for indexing information and ideas.

11 Ideas to Make Indexing Goals More Inspired—and Fun!

Thu, 05/07/2020 - 23:02

Around the world, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have made astounding contributions to indexing on an individual, ward, and stake level. These efforts have helped millions of people discover and connect to their families, even helping them find names of ancestors they never expected to take to the temple.

One important thing to remember, though, is that using number goals as an incentive isn’t the only way to index. While some members of ward and stake indexing groups might be motivated by reaching a number goal, others may feel burdened, guilty, or intimidated. A reliance on numbers can also create a feeling of urgency to index quickly rather than accurately.

Every record indexed can help someone somewhere learn about family. No matter how many records a ward member indexes, the contribution makes a difference.

The recent change to remove individual statistics from ward, stake, and general indexing groups reflects a need to focus on creating accurate records and using inspiration rather than numbers to direct indexing efforts.

Here are a few inspiration-focused and fun ideas for supporting Church members as they participate in indexing—ideas that don’t rely on charts, graphs, or numerical goals:

1. Be open to guidance from the Spirit.

Indexing is one way Church members can help participate in gathering Israel, but it’s not always the best option for everyone. Be prayerful about who you might invite to index and how you can best encourage and help them. Also consider praying for help to connect families with ancestors they are looking for. At times, indexers have even stumbled across their own family names as they have indexed.

2. Share fun unique things you find.

Historical records are about people from our past and give hints to their life stories. Can you find a unique name, an occupation, or an interesting fact in the records you are indexing? Share with your group via messaging or in a group gathering.

3. Get to know the places in historical records.

Are you indexing records from Minas Gerais, Brazil or Florence, Italy? Learn about the food, names, culture, or history of these places. You could even hold a themed activity.

4. Work in small support teams.

Have you ever thought an indexing project was intimidating or worried that your entries were off? Try working on it with a partner! Have one person fill in the index while another uses the internet to double-check spellings for names and locations. This teamwork can increase the quality of the record, and it might help you interpret hard-to-read records.

5. Center your goals on learning something new.

Instead of setting number goals, each person can learn to index a new type of record, a record from another part of the world, and so on. You can brainstorm ideas together and then look at help resources on FamilySearch.org, the FamilySearch Research Wiki, and elsewhere on the internet.

6. Invite group members to share an indexing story.

Indexing stories could be about an inspiring moment you had while indexing, the story behind how you got started, or simply about how indexing has brought you joy or satisfaction in your day-to-day life. It’s possible that not everyone in your group has something to share, but even a single story might further invite the Spirit into your meeting.

7. Talk to others about indexing.

Make a goal to talk about indexing with someone outside of the group and share an experience you’ve had. If indexing has blessed your life, your story might uplift others.

8. Invite group members to give a mini-lesson on indexing.

This short lesson could be on an indexing technique or something they have learned. Much of what a person knows about indexing can be learned by trial and error. Is there a way to help someone new to indexing avoid these errors?

9. Learn how to index in another language.

If you have group members with experience in another language and can dedicate time to online learning, indexing in another language could be a fun challenge. Go to the Language Resources page, and choose a language from the drop-down list. Be sure to study these resources and the language carefully to make your entries as accurate as possible.

10. Explore different ways to keep in touch.

Social connections can make for a great indexing experience, but what this looks like may be different for every group. Whether you chat via Facebook or WhatsApp, hop on a video call, or text back and forth while indexing, those connections can really make a difference.

11. Take a second look at your temple name cards.

Next time you take a family name to the temple or use Ordinances Ready, take a look at the person’s profile page on FamilySearch.org. (Use the Tree search, or click View Person in Ordinances Ready.) When you look at the sources for the person, check how many of them were indexed. If you click into one of these sources and see a typed record, that record was likely indexed by a volunteer like you. If the record has the option available, you might even be able to thank the volunteer who indexed the record.

A More Inspired Indexing Experience

So pick an activity. Spend an inspired evening having fun with indexing and discussing its joys without worrying too much about statistics. Don’t talk about numbers. Talk instead about the reasons why each of you love indexing.

How a Family Crest or Coat of Arms Leads to Family Discovery

Thu, 05/07/2020 - 17:00

Family crests and coats of arms are powerful family symbols passed down through generations. They were commonly used throughout the 11–17th centuries, and they can still be meaningful reminders for families past, present, and future.

The symbolism in the design of a family crest or coat of arms can tell you about your ancestors’ achievements and status in society—a real testament to a family’s legacy. Here’s everything you need to know to understand, find, or create your family’s coat of arms. 

What Is Heraldry?

Heraldry is a system used to design, display, and record coats of arms and family crests. These symbols were often used to differentiate knights in tournaments—picture the brightly emblazoned shields carried by medieval knights in shining armor. But heraldry was used for more than just tournaments. It allowed people to recognize opposing sides on battlefields, family lineages, alliances, and more.

Today, heraldry is still used by some individuals, companies, and cities to display their heritage and achievements. In modern uses, it can also be used to portray family values and ambitions.

What Is a Coat of Arms?

A coat of arms is a symbol used to identify families or individuals. It is a detailed design that often includes a shield, crest, helmet, motto, and more. The image could be used as a whole, or the crest can be used as a simplified symbol.

Going back to the medieval knight, remember the brightly emblazoned shield? The design on the knight’s shield was often the knight’s coat of arms. 

Coats of arms can help you learn a lot about your ancestry. They were intended to recognize achievements and family heritage, so the design can provide insight into your family’s legacy. They’re also passed down through generations and carry the history of the family with them.

What Is a Family Crest?

In a full coat of arms, the crest literally crests the design—that is to say that it is often located at the top of the image. The family crest is a smaller part of the design that can be used on its own when the entire coat of arms is too complex. Once again going back to the knight in shining armor, the crest may have been attached to the knight’s helmet.

Common family crests include a lion, cross, tiger, or horse, but there are many others out there. Some even use unicorns or monsters. Sounds like a fun conversation starter if you’re lucky enough to have one of them in your family tree!

Alternatively, the term family crest can refer to the overall design. Over time, family crest became interchangeable with coat of arms, but the distinction is still important to understand, particularly if you’re searching for your family crest.

How to Find Your Coat of Arms

If you have European heritage, you may have a coat of arms or family crest. Unfortunately, they’re rarer than you might think. Most commonly, only nobility or high-class families in medieval Europe had them because they were granted by kings to recognize achievements.

That rarity just makes it all the more exciting if you find one in your family tree! Search for coats of arms associated with your last name using 4crests, House of Names, All Family Crests, or other resources. If you find one, trace your family tree to find out if you can find a link or reference to the coat of arms. While you’re at it, take the opportunity to discover more about your heritage.

Trace Your Family Tree

Some families choose to adopt a coat of arms based only on a last name without an ancestral link, but this practice can hinder the significance and meaning behind the coat of arms. This guide can help you find out if a crest is associated with your family. An alternative is to create one that is unique and meaningful to your family!

How to Design a Coat of Arms

Designing your own coat of arms can be fun and insightful. Think about your family’s achievements and how you can incorporate them into your design. If you’re looking for inspiration, explore the stories your relatives have shared on FamilySearch Memories.

Parts of a Coat of Arms 

A coat of arms can be very detailed, and it often includes many elements. Although not every coat of arms has every piece, the following parts are often incorporated in the design.

Shield: The shield is the center of the design; it is the only necessary piece when designing a coat of arms.

Crest: This symbolic object sits atop of the coat of arms.

Helm: A helmet rests below the crest but above the shield. It reflects the origins of heraldry. A crown could replace or accompany the helmet. 

Wreath: The wreath is a rope or twisted cloth, a literal representation of the silk or rope used to tie a crest to a knight’s helmet.

Mantling: The mantling is a piece of cloth that flows out from the helmet. Originally, the cloth protected a knight’s armor.

Supporters: A pair of people or animals stand on either side of the shield and support it. They’re typically a local or hereditary figure, and they were traditionally used for nobility.

Compartment: The compartment is a base design (usually a landscape) on which the shield and supporters rest.

Motto: The motto is a saying displayed on a ribbon either below or above the rest of the design.

 Symbols and Their Meanings

These resources explain meanings behind different items and colors you can use in your family crest and coat of arms. Remember that the family crest can be used on its own, so choose something significant to you!

Of course, if you’re making your own, the most important thing is that it is meaningful to you and your family. Work together to include elements that speak to you personally and your heritage.

Regardless of whether you find a family crest that has been around for generations or you create a coat of arms yourself, crests and coats of arms are powerful symbols that can unify a family. How do you plan to use yours moving forward? Record the image and the meaning behind it to keep the memory alive in your family.

New Records on FamilySearch from April 2020

Wed, 05/06/2020 - 15:00

FamilySearch expanded its free online archives in April of 2020 with almost 57.2 million new indexed family history records from all over the world. New historical records were added from American Samoa, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile Denmark, Dominican Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, England, France, Germany, Guatemala, Honduras, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, the South Pacific, Sri Lanka, Uruguay, the United Kingdom, Venezuela, and the United States, which includes Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Delaware, the District of Colombia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Vermont.

United States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968, United States Public Records, 1970-2009, United States Rosters of Revolutionary War Soldiers and Sailors, 1775-1783, GenealogyBank Historical Newspaper Obituaries, 1815-2011, United States, California, Certificates Surrendered at San Francisco from Aliens Previously at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1912-1946, United States, Native American, Eastern Cherokee Enrollment Records, 1908-1910, and United States recruits for the Polish Army in France (1917-1919) are included as well.

Find your ancestors using these free archives online, including birth, marriage, death, and church records. Millions of new genealogy records are added each month to make your search easier.

CountryCollectionIndexed RecordsDigital ImagesCommentsAmerican Samoa American Samoa, Delayed Birth Registrations, 1962-19725,4330Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some access restrictions may apply)American Samoa American Samoa, Vital Records, 1850-193015,7740Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some access restrictions may apply)ArgentinaArgentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-198171,4160Added indexed records to an existing collectionAustraliaAustralia, South Australia, Prison Records, 1838-19122910Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Bahia, Civil Registration, 1877-197628,3920Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Cemetery Records, 1897-2012133,9510Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Minas Gerais, Civil Registration, 1879-194915,9540Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Santa Catarina, Catholic Church Records, 1714-19771,1950Added indexed records to an existing collectionBrazilBrazil, Santa Catarina, Civil Registration, 1850-199932,3140Added indexed records to an existing collectionCanadaNova Scotia Church Records, 1720-20016,3280Added indexed records to an existing collectionChileChile, Catholic Church Records, 1710-192841,8500Added indexed records to an existing collectionColombiaColombia, Bogotá, Burial Permits, 1960-199182,5950Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some access restrictions may apply)Costa RicaCosta Rica, Civil Registration, 1823-197540,1000Added indexed records to an existing collectionDenmarkDenmark, Århus Municipal Census, 193623,7620Added indexed records to an existing collectionDominican RepublicDominican Republic Miscellaneous Records, 1921-1980161,6130Added indexed records to an existing collectionDR CongoDemocratic Republic of the Congo, Census, 198461,1730New indexed records collectionEnglandEngland and Wales, National Index of Wills and Administrations, 1858-195767,2310Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland Death Records, 1998-20153,293,1640Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Cambridge Parish Registers, 1538-1983 2,2670Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Cumbria Parish Registers, 1538-1990221,0410Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Essex Non-Conformist Church Records, 1613-197119,3630Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Gloucestershire Non-Conformist Church Records, 1642-199639,6850Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some Restrictions Apply)EnglandEngland, Hampshire Parish Registers, 1538-19801190Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Herefordshire Bishop’s Transcripts, 1583-18981040Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Index to Register of Passport Applications, 1851-1903376,4880New indexed records collectionEnglandEngland, Norfolk Non-conformist Records, 1613-1901240Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Northumberland Non-Conformist Church Records, 1613-192076,2590Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Northumberland, Parish Registers, 1538-195054,5520Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Oxfordshire Parish Registers 1538-19041,0940Added indexed records to an existing collectionEnglandEngland, Yorkshire Marriage Bonds and Allegations, 1613-188767,1290Added indexed records to an existing collectionFranceFrance, Insee Social Security Death Index, 1970-201925,030,9600New indexed records collectionFranceFrance, Paris, Marriage Records, 1860-1918270,1800New indexed records collectionGermanyGermany, Prussia, Saxony, Census Lists, 1770-193445,8370Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Alta Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877-1994449,5050Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Baja Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877-1994157,9420Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Chiquimula, Civil Registration, 1877-2008205,0310Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, El Progreso, Civil Registration, 1877-1994116,8620Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Escuintla, Civil Registration, 1877-1994339,3500Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Guatemala, Civil Registration, 1877-20061,284,9930Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Huehuetenango, Civil Registration, 1877-1994315,9230Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Izabal, Civil Registration, 1877-1994159,2890Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Jutiapa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994231,9620Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Quetzaltenango, Civil Registration, 1877-1994499,6260Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Sacatepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877-1994150,5760Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, San Marcos, Civil Registration, 1877-1994473,1630Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Santa Rosa, Civil Registration, 1877-1994204,6840Added indexed records to an existing collectionGuatemalaGuatemala, Suchitepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877-1994278,8940Added indexed records to an existing collectionHondurasHonduras, Catholic Church Records, 1633-197839,5360Added indexed records to an existing collectionIrelandIreland Civil Registration, 1845-1913780Added indexed records to an existing collectionIrelandIreland, Medical Directory for Ireland, 18582,3730New indexed records collectionIrelandNorthern Ireland, Tithe Applotment Books, 1822-183770Added indexed records to an existing collectionItalyItaly, Roma, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1863-1930179,6440Added indexed records to an existing collectionJamaicaJamaica, Church of England Parish Register Transcripts, 1664-18802,4330Added indexed records to an existing collectionNetherlandsNetherlands, Noord-Holland, Civil Registration, 1811-195063,4890Added indexed records to an existing collectionParaguayParaguay, Catholic Church Records, 1754-201565,0300Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1935-199918,6770Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Ayacucho, Civil Registration, 1903-199980,1410Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Cemetery Records, 1912-20131,6790Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1888-199850,6170Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997104,9040Added indexed records to an existing collectionPeruPeru, Prelature of Yauyos-Cañete-Huarochirí, Catholic Church Records, 1665-201813,4320Added indexed records to an existing collectionPortugalPortugal, Setúbal, Catholic Church Records, 1555-19116020Added indexed records to an existing collectionPuerto RicoPuerto Rico, Civil Registration, 1805-20019,8580Added indexed records to an existing collectionSierra LeoneSierra Leone, Civil Births, 1802-19693280Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801-20041,3310Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Civil Death Registration, 1955-196611,3450Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Civil Marriage Records, 1840-1973101,9720Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, KwaZulu Natal, Vital Records, 1868-197617,6160Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Natal, Passenger Lists, 1860-19111280Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth AfricaSouth Africa, Transvaal, Probate Records from the Master of the Supreme Court, 1869-19581,128,5630Added indexed records to an existing collectionSouth Pacific (New Zealand)Niue, Vital Records, 1818-19941,4030New indexed records collectionSri LankaSri Lanka, Colombo District, Dutch Reformed Church Records, 1677-199010,3760Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited KingdomGreat Britain, War Office Registers, 1772-1935137,4870Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesAlabama, County Birth Registers, 1881-19305570Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesAlaska, Pioneer Home discharge index, 1913-1958100Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesArizona, Birth Certificates and Indexes, 1855-193055,2640New indexed records collectionUnited StatesArizona, Yavapai County, Pioneers’ Home Resident Ledger and Index, 1911-2000140Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesArkansas, County Voter Registration Records, 1868-191050,9020New indexed records collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-199470,1550Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Lassen County, State Board of Health, Burial Permits, 1931-198830Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Los Angeles, Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery/Crematory Records, 1884-20028,4960New indexed records collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Los Angeles, San Gabriel Cemetery Association, Cemetery Index 1872-200320,8150New indexed records collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Sacramento, Sacramento City Cemetery Burial Card Index,1840-200125,3690Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, San Benito County Registrar, Burial Permits 1911-19487,1920Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, San Francisco Crew Manifests, 1896-19212,5890New indexed records collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, San Mateo County, Colma, Italian Cemetery Records, 1899-201134,7080Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Solano County Genealogical Society, Burial Records210Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesCalifornia, Sonoma County, Sebastopol, Evergreen Lawn Cemetery Burial Records, 1800-20101,4210Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some access restrictions may apply)United StatesCalifornia, Tulare County, Visalia Cemetery Records, 1875-1990260Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesDelaware Vital Record Index Cards, 1680-1934150Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesDistrict of Columbia Deaths, 1874-19612,5190Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesFlorida, Fort Lauderdale Crew Lists, 1939-1945290Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesFlorida, Pensacola, Passenger lists of citizens and aliens arriving and departing at Pensacola, Florida, 1924-1948180Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Chatham, Savannah, Laurel Grove Cemetery Record Keeper’s Book (colored), 1852-194223,2140Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Columbus, Linwood and Porterdale Colored Cemeteries, Interment Records, 1866-20003410Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, County Voter Registrations, 1856-1909151,0250Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Savannah City Jail Registers, 1855-1873500Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Savannah Passenger Lists, 1906-19453,7420New indexed records collectionUnited StatesGeorgia, Washington County, Federal Census, 1890500Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesHawaii State Archives, Register of Voters, Hawaiian Islands, 1887-188814,6690New indexed records collectionUnited StatesHawaii, Board of Health, Marriage Record Indexes, 1909-198962,4260Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesHawaii, Collector of Customs, Ships’ Passenger Manifests, 1843-190065,2910New indexed records collectionUnited StatesHawaii, Passport Records, 1874-1898120Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesIdaho Naturalization Records, 1892-19901150Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesIdaho, Twin Falls County, Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery, Cemetery Records, 1937-19936,6040Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesIndiana, Bartholomew, Columbus, Garland Brook Cemetery Interment Records, ca.1885-ca.200013,6950New indexed records collectionUnited StatesIowa, Death Records, 1904-195170Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesIowa, Historical Society of Iowa, Divorce Records, 1906-1937118,2430New indexed records collectionUnited StatesIowa, Marshall County, Marshalltown, Riverside Cemetery Burial Records, ca.1800-ca.197513,8970New indexed records collectionUnited StatesIowa, Polk County, Cemetery Gravestone Records260Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana Confederate Pensions, 1898-19507540Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana, New Orleans, Interment Registers, 1836-19722,5500Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana, Orleans and St. Tammany Parish, Voter Registration Records, 1867-19053810Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana, Orleans Parish Death Records and Certificates, 1835-1954168,8970Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesLouisiana, Orleans Parish, Birth Records, 1819-19063520Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMaine, Cumberland County, Westbrook, Woodlawn Cemetery, Burial Records, 1914-1992300Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMaryland, Baltimore Passenger Lists Index, 1897-1952142,7070Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMassachusetts, Gloucester Passenger and Crew Lists, 1906-194324,1470New indexed records collectionUnited StatesMassachusetts, Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, 1921-1949262,8780New indexed records collectionUnited StatesMassachusetts, Revolutionary War, Index Cards to Muster Rolls, 1775-1783100Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMichigan, County Births, 1867-191757,7700Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMinnesota Deaths, 1887-2001396,5600Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMinnesota, Hennepin County, Minneapolis, Layman Cemetery Burial Records, 1860-192620,6620New indexed records collectionUnited StatesMississippi, Adams County, Natchez Death Index, 1835-19052290Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMississippi, County Marriages, 1858-19792260Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMississippi, Death Certificate Index, 1912-1943624,3760Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMissouri, Confederate Pension Applications and Soldiers Home Applications, 1911-19383,9880Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMontana Manifests of Immigrant Arrivals and Departures, 1923-19563650Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesMontana, Silver Bow County, Cemetery Indexes, 1880-20038,8840New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNebraska, Lancaster County, Wyuka Cemetery Burial Permits, 1883-199923,8510Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNebraska, Naturalization Records, 1855-1989143,5040New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Death Index, 1901-19031850Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Essex County, Superintendent of Soldiers’ Burials, 1776-197940Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Gloucester County, Clarksboro, Eglington Cemetery Records, 1880-19832,3380New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Mercer County, Veteran’s Service Office, Grave Registration Records, ca. 1770-ca.197925,7930New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Newark, Mount Olivet Cemetery Records, 1871-19843,3200New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNew Jersey, Newark, Woodland Cemetery Records, 1895-198045,6390New indexed records collectionUnited StatesNorth Carolina, Center for Health Statistics, Vital Records Unit, County Birth Records, 1913-192283,6760Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNorth Carolina, Department of Archives and History, Index to Vital Records, 1800-2000260Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesNorth Carolina, Wake County, Death Records, 1900-1909300Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOhio, Athens County, Deceased Veteran Grave Registration Card File Index, 1819-19365,1520Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOhio, Cincinnati, Vine Street Hill Cemetery Index of Burials, 1851-198660,2870Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOhio, County Naturalization Records, 1800-197720,1050Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOklahoma, Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Rose Hill Burial Park, Interment cards, 1917-19827260Added indexed records to an existing collection (Some access restrictions may apply)United StatesOklahoma, School Records, 1895-193640Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesOklahoma, Tulsa County, Rose Hill Memorial Park Interment Records, ca.1915 – ca.19825,3560New indexed records collectionUnited StatesPennsylvania Mortality Schedules, 1850-188065,4000Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesPennsylvania, Eastern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1795-193124,0090Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesPennsylvania, Philadelphia, Greenmount Cemetery Records, 1880-1966540Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesPennsylvania, Pittsburgh, Allegheny Cemetery Records, 1845 – 1960950Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesRhode Island, Providence County, Providence, Swan Point Cemetery Records, ca.1846-ca.195021,2800Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesSouth Carolina Deaths, 1915-1965800Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesSouth Carolina, Charleston County, Charleston Poorhouse and Correctional House Records, 1803-19166690Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesSouth Dakota, Grave Registration Records, 1940-1941208,3580Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesSouth Dakota, Veteran Graves Registration Records, 1940-194114,8300Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesTennessee, Davidson County, Death Records, 1900-1913200Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesTexas, Dallas County, Oakland Cemetery Interment Cards, 1891-19991,4970Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesTexas, El Paso, Applications for Non-Resident Aliens Border Crossing Identification Cards, 1945-19524400Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesTexas, Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Corpus Christi, Texas, and Vicinity, June 1948-January 19591,3370Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesTexas, Special Voter Registration, 1867-18692890Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968275,5060Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States Public Records, 1970-200950Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States Rosters of Revolutionary War Soldiers and Sailors, 1775-1783139,0600Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States, California, Certificates Surrendered at San Francisco from Aliens Previously at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1912-194623,1250New indexed records collectionUnited StatesUnited States, GenealogyBank Historical Newspaper Obituaries, 1815-20114,985,1230Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States, Native American, Eastern Cherokee Enrollment Records, 1908-19106,2840Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States, New York Land Records, 1630-197510,815,8360Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUnited States, Recruits for the Polish Army in France, 1917-191910Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUtah, Brigham City Family History Center, Obituary Collection, 1930-201541,2900Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesUtah, World War I Army Servicemen Records Abstracts, 1914-191820Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesVermont Vital Records, 1760-19542,2210Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesVermont, Passenger Lists, 1895-1924102,3510New indexed records collectionUnited StatesVirginia, Bureau of Vital Statistics, County Marriage Registers, 1853-193516,9100Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesVirginia, Southern Claims Commission Approved Claims, 1871-18805,4930New indexed records collectionUnited StatesWisconsin, Milwaukee, Holy Cross Cemetery, Interment Records, 1909-197989,4900New indexed records collectionUnited StatesWisconsin, Milwaukee, Wanderer’s Rest Cemetery Records, 1880-19791520Added indexed records to an existing collectionUnited StatesWyoming, Reclaim the Records, State Archives Vital Records, 1908-19661,5920Added indexed records to an existing collectionUruguayUruguay, Passenger Lists, 1888-1980204,7460Added indexed records to an existing collectionVenezuelaVenezuela, Catholic Church Records, 1577-199552,2280Added indexed records to an existing collection    

What to Do for Mother’s Day—Simple, Meaningful Activities

Wed, 05/06/2020 - 14:50

Some simple Mother’s Day activities to remind us of those we love and help us cherish the idea of motherhood.

Have you ever found yourself stuck when figuring out what to do for Mother’s Day? Mother’s Day activities come in all shapes and sizes, but there is one thing that they should all do—make Mother’s Day special for everyone involved. The simple activities we share below do just that.

No matter what your life circumstance—whether you are female or male, married or single, young or old—these activities are meant to help you cherish the idea of motherhood and honor the women who have made a difference in your life.

1. Record or Share a Memory

Your memories and stories matter. This Mother’s Day, take a photo of yourself with someone you love, or write down an experience that matters to you.

Think of one of the many women who have touched your life. Is there a memory you have that you can write down? Maybe the memory is of your mother, your grandmother, or someone who has helped you overcome challenges. Motherhood and sisterhood are full of precious moments and hard moments. Taking the time to preserve one of them could be a very satisfying Mother’s Day activity.

If you are not a writing person, take advantage of Mother’s Day gatherings and connections to snap a photo or make a recording. When was the last time you took a picture together or shared a candid moment with your child? Has your family ever asked about and recorded Mom’s or Grandmother’s life story?

Consider Sharing or Preserving the Memory.

Sharing stories connects us to others and helps us grow as individuals, as families, and as friends. Once you’ve chosen a memory, consider sharing it in a way you’re comfortable with. Maybe that is through social media, in person, or by preserving that memory for generations to come.

FamilySearch Memories is a great tool for preserving important stories and photos. You can add image files, documents, and even recordings to your gallery on FamilySearch.org and keep them forever.  

Add a Memory on FamilySearch.org

Download the Memories app via iOS or Android.

2. Cook Up a Family Recipe—or Pass One On

Many women are the keepers of recipes and food traditions. This Mother’s Day, ask your mom or another woman in your life for a family recipe. Or take some time to share your own recipes with someone you love.

For some women, cooking is the last thing they want to do on Mother’s Day. For others, gathering in the kitchen to cook a family recipe is just what they need. Whether you decide to cook something for the women in your life, cook something with them, or order your favorite foods to eat together, sharing food and company on Mother’s Day might be an activity that everyone can participate in.

Mother’s Day might also be a good day to gather family recipes for yourself or someone else. If you need some inspiration, check out one of these articles:

3. Look Up the Women in Your Family Tree

How much do you know about your grandmother? What about your great-grandmother and great-great-great? This Mother’s Day, see how much you can find about your ancestors who were women.

If you’re looking for a more unique Mother’s Day idea for you or your family, consider seeing how much you can learn about your ancestors who were women. Each of us comes from a long line of women who have shaped our lives—influencing where we live, what we look like, and, often, how we were raised.

If you or your family have put together a family tree, that’s a great way to get started. Look at the names and dates for your female ancestors, tracing each family line or looking at generation upon generation. Does your family tree tell you where each woman was born?

A genealogy website such as FamilySearch.org might also give you photos, documents, journals, and other sources of information about your ancestors. They may even have a timeline of life events you can look at. (For help navigating the FamilySearch Family Tree, check out this article.)

If you don’t have a family tree, you can create an account on FamilySearch.org and get started for free. As you enter what you know about your parents, grandparents, and so on, the FamilySearch Family Tree can connect you to what others have already entered about your relatives. Try it and see what you can find!

4. Do a Simple Act of Service

The essence of motherhood is caring and nurturing. It is loving another person and developing relationships in a way that helps others grow. This Mother’s Day, think about who you can show love to, and do something kind for them.

On the day we honor mothers and women everywhere, there is probably no better way to celebrate than to love others around us. Mothers, daughters, sisters, grandmothers, and the other women in our life could certainly use something to ease their burdens on this day of all days.

Whether it is a smile, a call or a conversation, dropping off a meal, watching a video with someone, or sending a video message—even letting someone get some much-needed sleep, think of what might help the very special women in your life, and do it on Mother’s Day.

Aside from reaching out to women on this special holiday, you can also celebrate motherhood by noticing and helping those around you. Whatever their role and situation, women are often found loving and serving. Think of how the women in your life have helped you learn and mature. How have you appreciated their showing love to you? How can you help make that change in someone else’s life this Mother’s Day?

Mother’s Day activities celebrate motherhood and womanhood in different ways. What matters most on Mother’s Day is picking an idea that works best for you and the women you know.

If you tried any of these activities or have other ideas of what to do for Mother’s Day, feel free to share in the comments below.