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Have You Seen This?—Cool Features on the Family Tree App

FamilySearch - Fri, 02/15/2019 - 15:45

Have you tried using the Family Tree app to learn about your family? The mobile app has some features you may not have seen yet—and they give you a powerful way to connect with your family.

With the Family Tree app, you can search for ancestors and learn about their life experiences wherever you happen to be—at home or on the go. You can find out if you’re related to your friends, co-workers, neighbors, and anyone with a FamilySearch tree!

Discover How You Are Related to Someone Nearby

Have you ever wondered how you are related to someone you’ve met? The Relatives around Me feature in the Family Tree app is a great get-to-know-you tool, as Eric Nielson recently discovered. He and a group of friends signed in to the Family Tree app, and three of them discovered they were distant cousins. About using this feature, Eric said, “I feel it brings that ‘small world’ feeling. It provides a nice bonding experience.” Learn more…

Quickly Look at Record Hints

FamilySearch record hints can help you find out more about your family, verify important information, and discover sources that may expand your family tree. With the Family Tree app, you can look at record hints wherever you happen to be, quickly compare records with an ancestor’s profile, and attach the records as a source—all in a matter of minutes! Learn more…

See What the Family Tree Knows about an Ancestor

Did you know you can simply open the Family Tree app and search for an ancestor without ever signing in? Find a relative, learn about your family name, and see what else the FamilySearch Family Tree can tell you with the updated search tool on the Family Tree app. Learn more…

See Your Ancestors on a World Map

Track your ancestors around the globe to see where they were born, where they lived, and even where they were buried. With the Family Tree app, you can follow your ancestors’ life events using this interactive map. The Map My Ancestor tool is powerful enough to show you specific regions and cities where your ancestor visited, as long as that information is added to the FamilySearch tree. Learn more…

With so many features available to people using the FamilySearch Family Tree app, there is sure to be something that will interest people of all ages. Download the app, and give it a try! You can find it in the Apple App Store or on Google Play.

Need Help Navigating the Family Tree App?

If you’re having trouble finding features on the mobile app, don’t fret! Here are some quick directions for how to use each of the features mentioned above.

How to See If You Are Related to Someone Nearby

To use the Relatives around Me feature, everyone participating must sign in to the app and be within approximately 100 feet of each other. Those with an iOS device can tap on the word More at the bottom of their screen and then choose the option Relatives around Me. On an Android device, you can find the Relatives around Me tool under the 3-bar options button.

Relatives Around Me on iOS.

Relatives Around Me on Android.

Be sure that everyone participating taps the green button to start scanning and has location services turned on for their device so the app knows you are close in proximity.

Anyone using the tool within range will show up in a list on your mobile device. Selecting a person’s name will bring up a pedigree chart showing how you are related. You can use this tool with any number of people, whether you are with a friend, at work, or even just meeting someone for the first time.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

How to Look at Record Hints

FamilySearch regularly compares your ancestors’ profile information with old and new records to see if there are any possible matches. These possible matches show up as record hints that can help you find records without filling out search forms or looking through record collections.

To see these hints on an iOS device, tap Tasks at the bottom of your screen. For Android, tap the 3-bar menu, and then tap Ancestors with Tasks. This feature will show you a list of relatives. To see a possible record match, tap on any relative who has a blue record icon.

The record matches might help you discover something new about your family or confirm information already in your tree. To find out, pick a record to explore, and tap the down arrow. You can read the record’s basic information there, or scroll down and tap the green button to compare the record to your ancestor’s profile.

As you compare information, notice the clickable icons and links. These icons and links help you see more information, attach the record to someone in your tree, and quickly add information to the family tree. (Click here to learn more about attaching and reviewing records.)

Record Hints on iOS.

Record Hints on Android.

Quick tip: Have you ever wanted to use multiple screens in the Family Tree app? Now you can! Read more here.

As more and more records are made available online, record hints can help you find newly added records without the hassle of repeated searching. The mobile app can help you make discoveries whenever you decide to pull out your device and take a look.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

See What the Family Tree Knows about an Ancestor—without Signing In

Open the Family Tree app to the signed-out screen, and tap the green button that says Search for an Ancestor. Enter information about one of your relatives, and then tap Search.

Logged out iOS Homescreen.

Logged out Android Homescreen.

FamilySearch will find records, photos, and more that might match your ancestor. Even if you don’t know specific details about a relative, try putting a last name into this simple search, and see what happens! Watch your friends’ faces light up when they find more information about their family.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

How to Find a Relative While Signed In

Open the Family Tree app, sign in, and tap the search icon in the top right area of your screen. Enter at least your ancestor’s last name—the more details you add, the better! Then tap Find. This search is an easy way to learn about your family’s last name, quickly update a relative’s information, or find a relative and learn more about the family.

Using this feature on the FamilySearch Family Tree app can help you have a deeper connection to family, anywhere and anytime.

Find a Person on iOS.

Find a Person on Android.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

How to See Your Ancestors on a World Map

To see your ancestors’ life events on a world map, open the Family Tree app, and tap More on an iOS device or the 3-bar menu on an Android device. Then tap Map My Ancestors. A world map will appear with blue bubbles showing numbers of events that happened in a particular location or profile images of your ancestors. Tap any of the bubbles, or use two fingers to zoom in and out, and let the fun begin!

Map My Ancestors on iOS.

Map My Ancestors on Android.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…


The World’s Largest Shared Family Tree

FamilySearch - Fri, 02/15/2019 - 13:14

The free FamilySearch website is home to the world’s largest online family tree. Known as the FamilySearch Family Tree, this shared family tree is home to information about more than 1.2 billion ancestors, which has been contributed by millions of descendants.

What’s a “Shared Family Tree”?

FamilySearch’s unified family tree differs from the tree-building experience at most other websites. Instead of concentrating efforts on privately constructing their own individual trees, FamilySearch tree builders cooperate to build a single, shared tree that helps you and others discover more about ancestors and other family members.

One Profile for Every Deceased Person

The FamilySearch shared tree strives to have just one public profile for every deceased person who has ever lived. Descendants contribute what they know about a person to a single, shared profile, rather than scattering their knowledge across multiple profiles on several trees, some of which may have privacy barriers.

Note: On the FamilySearch Family Tree, personal account information and any details about living persons are kept private. Only deceased persons have public profiles.

Why Use the FamilySearch Shared Tree?

The FamilySearch Family Tree can help you more easily connect to your family and build your family history. Here are five ways it might help you.

  1. Discover New Information

    A shared family tree can help you discover new information about your ancestors and even find relatives you weren’t aware of. Each piece of information someone adds—a document, a photo, a memory, a burial location—may shed light on an ancestor’s identity or life experiences.

  2. Build Your Tree with Ease

    It can be tedious work to fill out each ancestor’s profile for your family tree on your own. When you connect to the FamilySearch shared tree, some of your ancestors may have an abundance of information already in their profile. Even if you are the first to add a specific ancestor to the shared tree, FamilySearch can show you possible records for that ancestor, and other family members can help you by filling in what they know.

  3. Get a More Complete Picture

    The overall result of a well-sourced shared tree can be much more complete and accurate than individual trees. Although information entered by users may at times differ from what you know about your ancestor, the FamilySearch Family Tree enables all descendants to share information that others might not know and add sources to confirm correct information.

  4. Connect with Other Descendants

    Working together on a global tree also helps descendants connect with each other. You may find a relative who has visited the same graves, asked the same questions about—and even learned to love or admire—the same ancestors.

  5. Work on Your Family History for Free

    When you sign in on a free FamilySearch account and connect yourself to the shared family tree, you’ll be able to see all your connected ancestors in a personal tree view. This online family tree lets you add life events to your ancestors’ profiles; look at a map of where they may have travelled; view and add photos, memories, and records; and much more.

To make discoveries using the FamilySearch Family Tree, sign in to FamilySearch.org or the Family Tree mobile app. You can also learn more about the FamilySearch shared tree on the FamilySearch blog.

New to FamilySearch? Sign Up for a Free Account

See what the world’s largest shared tree can tell you about your family. Sign up on FamilySearch.org, or download the Family Tree app for iOS or Android.


FamilySearch Affiliates—Treasure Troves for Family Historians

FamilySearch - Tue, 02/12/2019 - 15:20

Neither Curt Witcher nor Sue Kaufman have spent their careers working in their first chosen professions—and now they both work in the same field, one that leads Witcher to quip at times that he “works with the dead.”

Fascinated by biographies and history, Curt Witcher first planned to be an educator, teaching for a semester in Santa Fe, New Mexico, while a part of the St. John the Baptist provincial seminary system.

Sociology originally captured Sue Kaufman’s imagination, which led to a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Southern Illinois University.

Witcher and Kaufman now direct two of the largest public genealogy libraries in the United States.

Libraries and Affiliate Libraries

Witcher manages the Genealogy Center of the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Kaufman heads the Clayton Library for Genealogical Research in the Houston Public Library, in Houston, Texas.

Both libraries are partners with FamilySearch International, the world’s largest genealogy organization, and they belong to FamilySearch’s network of affiliates. Both libraries work with FamilySearch, which is a part of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, to digitize their vast genealogical collections to make them available online.

Choosing a Career as a Genealogy Librarian

Both Witcher and Kaufman found their way serendipitously to genealogy library careers through similar routes. Each worked at college libraries either as an undergraduate or graduate student and found themselves drawn to the service-oriented aspect of helping others in their research quests.

Witcher, a native of southern Indiana, began at Fort Wayne’s library, where he has now worked for more than 39 years. Kaufman, a Chicago native, chose a genealogy librarian opening over a children’s librarian opening when she started at the library in Peoria, Illinois.

Later, they worked together in Fort Wayne for six years before Kaufman moved to Texas to manage the Houston library. “Curt was a huge mentor in my life. I learned so much from him,” Kaufman said.

The Genealogy Center of the Allen County Public Library—Fort Wayne, Indiana

Only the Family History Library in Salt Lake City is larger than Allen County’s Genealogy Center, a fact that often surprises family history newcomers. “A lot of people say, ‘Fort Wayne? Fort Wayne where?’” Witcher reported about his library’s home city. “People who have no idea of Indiana say, ‘Fort Wayne, that’s in Texas, isn’t it?”

Seasoned genealogists recognize the center, however, which traces its origins to 1961. The late library director Fred Reynolds, although not a genealogist himself, was a driving force behind its creation. As Witcher said, Fred “was able to look at the tea leaves and see that there was a lot of interest, predicting the growth that we see today.”

Libraries at the time of the genealogy center’s creation were well-equipped to handle a variety of patrons, but they didn’t provide the services that really met genealogists’ needs, who “are amateur historians, who come in, use the materials, ask a lot of questions, and stay a long time,” Witcher said.

“Fred wanted a place where genealogists could come and talk to librarians who were knowledgeable about how to do family history and how to connect to resources,” he explained.

The concept was a success. “It was like a match to dry wood, causing a bonfire. The idea took off, and people started coming to us,” Witcher reported.

Annually, 67,000 to 68,000 people from around the world visit Fort Wayne’s Genealogy Center. That number is down slightly in recent years as more individuals explore their family history in online resources first.

The center employs seven librarians who specialize in genealogy and manage its vast collections. These experts also help customers search for their roots. Witcher said the number of genealogy librarians who are continuously on the floor at the genealogy center and are directly interacting with customers is unusual. “It harkens back to Fred Reynolds and his desire for librarians who could do genealogy research and help customers be successful in their efforts.”

The Clayton Library for Genealogical Research—Houston Public Library, in Houston, Texas

The Clayton Library for Genealogical Research has roots in the 1960s too. Originally its genealogy collection was part of the Houston Public Library in downtown Houston. After a gift of property from the 1966 estate of William Clayton, a prominent Texas businessman, the genealogy collection moved to the Clayton historic home and later its own building when it outgrew that second location. It remains part of the Houston Public Library system.

The Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research offers extensive collections covering the entire United States, although its collections have a special emphasis on Texas, Louisiana, and the Gulf Coast. “One lady found her ancestor in an Alaskan cemetery book here,” Kaufman said.

There are also extensive international sources for identifying immigrants from Canada, Mexico, and Europe. “We have material that you won’t find anywhere else,” Kaufman reported.

Extensive Record Collections

The Clayton facility’s open-access shelves hold 120,000 research volumes, 3,490 periodical titles, and a vast microfilm collection of census records, ship passenger lists, military records, and many state and local records that are unavailable on the internet. The library also has individual family histories.

At the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, the Genealogy Center houses the largest genealogy collection in a public library. Its collections include 503,156 printed volumes and 661,532 items on microfilm and microfiche. Its collection generally focuses on North America but also includes a wide variety of British Isles materials and some German resources. Also included in the collections are holdings in Native American and African American genealogy as well as Civil War resources. The center also has an extensive collection of individual family histories and city directories.

Getting Help with Family History

Both libraries offer genealogy workshops, lectures, and one-on-one genealogy help. Both managers emphasize that helping genealogy buffs in their research is a main service of their facilities.

In fact, in 2016 Indiana’s lieutenant governor presented Witcher with the Hoosier Hospitality Award for his customer-oriented approach that attracts genealogy visitors from around the globe.

“We don’t want people to think of family history as hard research. We want people to think of it as fun, engaging research, research that you don’t want to put down. We want the library to be a welcoming place,” Witcher explained.

The managers of the Genealogy Center and the Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research maintain close ties with local, state, and national genealogical societies. Each has served in leadership positions in a number of these societies. In March, 2018, Witcher and Kaufman were presenters of several workshops at RootsTech in Salt Lake City. Annually, they speak at numerous family history conferences.

Making Collections Searchable Online

RootsTech isn’t the only connection these libraries have with FamilySearch. As affiliates of FamilySearch, each library participates in an ongoing effort to digitize their historical books, publications, and other materials to eventually make them available online.

FamilySearch sends mobile digitization teams with specialized cameras, portable scanners, and laptops with FamilySearch’s proprietary software to locations worldwide. Currently, FamilySearch has 322 cameras in operation, including teams at both the Allen County Public Library and the Houston Public Library. FamilySearch offers these digitization services for free.

In Fort Wayne for the past six years, teams of FamilySearch volunteers have digitized a wide variety of records. The current nine volunteers continue to capture images from a collection of 1,000 ledger books from Lake County, Indiana, among the many other record books and family histories they scan. Additionally, other libraries send historical books to Allen County for the FamilySearch teams to digitize.

“It’s really a wonderful partnership. They digitize hundreds of books a month that will be posted to the FamilySearch website. It’s true dedication because scanning isn’t the most exciting activity in the world,” Witcher said, “yet it benefits so many.”

Kaufman believes that Clayton’s participation with FamilySearch has allowed it to be on “the forefront of digitization and sharing material with the larger genealogy community.”

“As part of the wider genealogy community, this allows us to spread the word about how important it is to find your family,” she said.

The library’s FamilySearch teams work in what Kaufman labeled “a small utility closet” and she too marvels at their dedication. “It’s an overwhelming concept of service because you have volunteers who close up their houses or sell their houses, and they come and sit in this closet for hours and are happy to do so,” she said.

Kaufman would like to see the Clayton Library become a FamilySearch hub for digitization, having other smaller libraries send their books and materials to be digitized. She also hopes that the digitization project, besides increasing the online materials, will prompt individuals to further investigate the resources available at libraries.

“There has been a whole shift in the way that people do family history. There is a learning curve of getting people to understand that it’s not all on the internet,” Kaufman said.

Witcher said that most library customers coming in have relied on precious few online resources. “There are amazing resources online, and most people only use just a very thin slice,” he reported.

The library managers embrace this ongoing collaboration between libraries and FamilySearch as helping their local customers as well as the genealogy community at large.

“We have always been believers in the old saying, ‘The incoming tide raises all ships.’ The more comprehensive, the more robust that FamilySearch can be as an online presence, the better it is for everyone in the genealogy space. And the better it is for us as librarians to help people find their family stories here in Fort Wayne or anywhere else,” Witcher said.

Learn more online about Allen County’s Genealogy Center and the Clayton Library for Genealogical Research, or visit them in person!

Genealogy and family history centers interested in the FamilySearch affiliate library program can email BushCD@FamilySearch.org to learn more.


Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction—Watch Online

FamilySearch - Fri, 02/08/2019 - 14:32

The Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction session, available online, is for anyone interested in helping others enjoy the blessings of temple and family history work. You might be helping a family you minister to or a particular member of your quorum or class, or you might have a family history calling or responsibility.

If you are a stake president or bishop or serve in a Relief Society or elders quorum presidency or as a ward temple and family history leader or consultant, the Temple and Family Leadership Instruction will give you guidance and direction that will help you with your calling. Watch the session online, and you are bound to come away with new ideas for serving individuals and families more effectively.

Attending the session is simple. It doesn’t matter where you live. Just go to lds.org/family-history on the day the session is scheduled, and stream it live. Or visit the site on a later date to watch a recording.


Watch the Leadership Instruction Online

While you’re there, check out the videos of previous Leadership Instruction sessions. If you have questions about your responsibilities in temple and family history, this is a great place to find answers!

Family Discovery Day is another great event that you can attend for free or watch portions online. Find out more about this fun and inspirational event here.

This Year’s Leadership Instruction Session

The 2019 Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction session will take place on Thursday, February 28, from 7:00–8:00 p.m. (mountain standard time). Elder David A. Bednar, Elder Gary E. Stevenson, and Elder Dale G. Renlund of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles are all scheduled to speak. They will give important counsel to guide you in your calling and in helping others do temple and family history service. Here are some of the topics likely to be discussed:

  • The role of temple and family history in the plan of salvation.
  • How family history can be used in ministering to family and neighbors.
  • Ways for understanding and structuring temple and family history service at the ward level.

The 2019 session will be broadcast in English, Spanish, Portuguese, and French. Transcripts in other languages will be made available in the coming months, including German, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Russian.

If you’ve been looking for help with your temple and family history responsibilities, then don’t miss the 2019 Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction!

Join the Family Discovery Day live stream on LDS.org on Saturday, March 2, at 9:30 a.m. mountain standard time.

Past Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction

In the 2018 session, leaders of the Church encouraged ward temple and family history consultants to follow the Savior’s example of ministering to people one-on-one, as individuals and families. They talked about the importance of creating personalized family history experiences and urged audience members to focus especially on youth and new members.

Excerpts from this and other Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction sessions are always available for you to watch–along with many other great tools to help you with your calling.

2018 Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction

2018 Session Summaries and Full Transcripts

Temple and Family History Leadership Instruction Archives

You can find family history resources on FamilySearch.org. RootsTech, a family history conference hosted by FamilySearch, is also a great resource for learning more about family history. Learn more about RootsTech.


New Records on FamilySearch from January 2019

FamilySearch - Mon, 02/04/2019 - 18:05

FamilySearch expanded its free online archives in January 2019 with over 25 million new indexed family history records and over 170,000 digital images from around the world. New historical records were added from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Cape Verde, Chile, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, England, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Peru, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States, which includes Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio, Texas, and Virginia. Records were also added from United States Cemetery Abstracts, Native American eastern Cherokee Indian Reservation Rolls, United States Obituaries, and United States Veterans Administration Master Index. New digital images were added from BillionGraves.

Find your ancestors using these free archives online, including birth, marriage, death, and church records. Millions of new genealogy records are added each month to make your search easier.

Country Collection Indexed Records Digital Records Comments Australia Australia, South Australia, School Admission Registers, 1873–1985 50,944 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Austria Austria, Carinthia, Gurk Diocese, Catholic Church Records, 1527–1986 75,102 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Belgium Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1541–1914 2,757 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Benin Benin, Civil Registration of Deaths, 1891–2014 10 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Bolivia Bolivia Catholic Church Records, 1566–1996 419,322 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Brazil Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, Civil Registration, 1829–2012 4,552,840 0 New indexed records collection Brazil Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980 2,120 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Cape Verde Cape Verde, Catholic Church Records, 1787–195 19,477 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Chile Chile, Cemetery Records, 1821–2015 70,261 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Costa Rica Costa Rica, Civil Registration, 1823–1975 75,296 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Czech Republic Czech Republic, Church Books, 1552–1981 1,059 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Dominican Republic Dominican Republic Civil Registration, 1801–2010 6,437 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection El Salvador El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704–2001
306,119 0 Added indexed records and images to an existing collection England England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537–1918 319 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection England England, Northumberland, Parish Registers, 1538–1950 994,791 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection France France, Calvados, Military Registration Cards, 1867–1921 1,388 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection France France, Convict Register, 1650–1867 48,409 0 New indexed records collection France France, Haute-Garonne, Toulouse, Church Records, 1539–1793 1,151 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection France France, Saône-et-Loire, Parish and Civil Registration, 1530–1892 3,064,022 0 New indexed records collection France France, Vienne, Census, 1856 372,562 0 New indexed records collection France France, Vienne, Census, 1876 304,196 0 New indexed records collection France France, Vienne, Military Draft Cards, 1867–1921 511 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Germany Germany, Baden, Archdiocese of Freiburg im Breisgau, Catholic Church Records, 1678–1930 7,397,644 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Germany Germany, Baden, Stebbach, Church Book Extracts, 1675–1951 3,457 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Germany Germany, Bavaria, Diocese of Augsburg, Catholic Church Records, 1615–1939 2,871,125 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Germany Germany, Rhineland, Diocese of Trier, Catholic Church Records, 1704–1957 34,378 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Germany Germany, Schleswig-Holstein, Kreis Steinburg, Civil Registration, 1874–1983 17,160 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Hungary Hungary Civil Registration, 1895–1980 113,787 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Italy, Campobasso, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1918 7,900 0 New indexed records collection Italy Italy, Mantova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1496–1906 34,729 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Italy Italy, Terni, Civil Registration, 1861–1921 123,204 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Italy Italy, Vicenza, Bassano del Grappa, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1871–1942 120,752 0 New indexed records collection Netherlands Netherlands, Noord-Holland, Civil Registration, 1811–1950 55,943 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Nicaragua Nicaragua Civil Registration, 1809–2013 35,367 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Other BillionGraves Index 173,946 173,946 Added indexed records to an existing collection Peru Peru, Diocese of Huacho, Catholic Church Records, 1560–1952 19,808 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection Peru Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903–1998 18,924 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection South Africa South Africa, Pietermaritzburg Estate Files 1846–1950 3,686 0 New indexed records and images collection South Africa South Africa, Cape Province, Civil Deaths, 1895–1972 330,782 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection South Africa South Africa, Transvaal, Civil Death, 1869–1954 134,526 0 New indexed records collection United Kingdom Great Britain, War Office Registers, 1772–1935 3,153 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Delaware Vital Records, 1650–1974 126 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Georgia Probate Records, 1742–1990 321 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871–1920 94,757 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Indiana, Ripley County, Osgood, Greendale Cemetery Records, 1861–2007 4,443 0 New indexed records collection United States Maine, Tombstone Inscriptions, Surname Index, 1620–2014 129,668 0 New indexed records collection United States Maryland, Baltimore, Loudon Park Cemetery, Cemetery Records, 1853–1986 356,122 0 New indexed records collection United States Missouri, Civil Marriages, 1820–1874 785 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Missouri, Pre-WWII Adjutant General Enlistment Contracts, 1900–1941 83,991 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Montana, Cascade County Records, 1880–2009 45,437 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Montana, Granite County Records, 1865–2009 656,620 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Montana, Teton County Records, 1881–2012 348 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Ohio, County Naturalization Records, 1800–1977 20,709 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Texas, Swisher County Records, 1879–2012 72 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States United States, Cemetery Abstracts 288,877 0 New indexed records collection United States United States, Native American, Eastern Cherokee Indian Reservation Rolls, 1848–1970 769 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States United States, Obituaries, American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 1899–2012 1,392,105 0 New indexed records collection United States United States, Veterans Administration Master Index, 1917–1940 487,730 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection United States Virginia, Lynchburg, Diuguid Funeral Home records, 1820–1971 39 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection

Over 6 billion searchable historic records are available from around the world on FamilySearch.org. Records are published with the help of thousands of volunteer indexers who transcribe digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. To help make more historical records from the world’s archives available online, volunteer with FamilySearch Indexing.

Learn how to search the records on FamilySearch to find exactly what you’re looking for.

 


Cool Features on the Family Tree App

FamilySearch - Mon, 02/04/2019 - 09:44

Have you tried using the Family Tree app to learn about your family or to take a family name to the temple? The mobile app has some features you may not have seen yet–and they give you a powerful way to connect with your family.

With the Family Tree app, you can search for ancestors and learn about their life experiences wherever you happen to be–at home or on the go. You can find out if you’re related to your ministering brothers and sisters, your neighbors, ward members, and anyone with a FamilySearch tree!

 

Download the FamilySearch Family Tree App

With the Click of a Button, Find Ordinances That Are Ready

Doing ordinance work for your own ancestors is a special experience, but finding family ordinances that are ready for the temple can sometimes be overwhelming. Now, members of the Church can retrieve temple-ready ordinances with a tap of the finger using the Ordinances Ready feature. Learn more…

Find Out How You Are Related to Someone Nearby

Have you ever wondered how you are related to someone you’ve met? The Relatives Around Me feature in the Family Tree app is a great get-to-know-you tool, as Eric Nielson discovered at church this past week. He and others all signed in to the Family Tree app, and three of them discovered they were related to one another, although distantly. About finding his new cousins, Eric said, “I feel it brings that ‘small world’ feeling to my ward and friends. It provides a nice bonding experience and gives a closer sense of being brothers and sisters.” Learn more…

Quickly Look at Record Hints

FamilySearch record hints can help you find out more about your family, verify important information, and discover sources that open doors for temple work. With the Family Tree app, you can look at record hints wherever you happen to be, quickly compare records with an ancestor’s profile, and attach the records as a source–all in a matter of minutes! Learn more…

See What the Family Tree Knows about an Ancestor

Did you know you can simply open the Family Tree app and search for an ancestor without ever signing in? Find a relative, learn about your family name, and see what else the FamilySearch Family Tree can tell you with the updated search tool on the Family Tree app. This search also makes it easy to use the app as a ministering tool! Learn more…

See Your Ancestors on a World Map

Track your ancestors around the globe to see where they were born, where they lived, and even where they were buried. With the Family Tree app, you can follow your ancestors’ life events using this interactive map. The Map My Ancestor tool is powerful enough to show you specific regions and cities where your ancestor visited, so long as that information is added to the FamilySearch tree. Learn more…

 

With so many features available to people using the FamilySearch Family Tree app, there is sure to be something that will interest people of all ages. Download the app, and give it a try! You can find it in the Apple App Store or on Google Play.

 

 

 

 

Need Help Navigating the Family Tree App?—Here Are Some Quick Tips

If you’re having trouble finding features on the mobile app, don’t fret! Here are some quick directions for how to use each of the features we mentioned above.

How to Find Ordinances with the Click of a Button

Ordinances Ready searches the FamilySearch Family Tree, as well as temple reservation and shared lists, to find available ordinances for people you are related to. It also does simple checks for accuracy and verifies that you have permission to perform the ordinances.

To use Ordinances Ready on an iOS device, tap the temple icon at the bottom of your screen. On Android, go to the 3-bar menu, and tap Temple. From there, all you have to do is tap the green button to get started!

Ordinances Ready on iOS

Ordinances Ready on Android

If you do not have relatives with available ordinances, the Ordinances Ready search will expand to include ordinances that others have submitted to the temple. This allows everyone the opportunity to help those who are awaiting ordinances beyond the veil, and lets you see their name and other details in the Family Tree app.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

How to See If You Are Related to Someone Nearby

To use the Relatives around Me feature, everyone participating must sign in to the app and be within approximately 100 feet of each other. Those with an iOS device can tap on the word More at the bottom of their screen and then choose the option Relatives around Me. On an Android device, you can find the Relatives around Me tool under the 3-bar options button.

Relatives Around Me on iOS

Relatives Around Me on Android

Be sure that everyone participating taps the green button to start scanning and has location services turned on for their device so the app knows you are close in proximity.

Anyone using the tool within range will show up in a list on your mobile device. Selecting a person’s name will bring up a pedigree chart showing how you are related to them. You can use this tool with any number of people, whether you are with a friend, at a ward activity, or even just meeting someone for the first time.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

How to Look at Record Hints

FamilySearch regularly compares your ancestors’ profile information with old and new records to see if there are any possible matches. These possible matches show up as record hints that can help you find records without filling out search forms or looking through record collections.

To see these hints on an iOS device, tap Tasks at the bottom of your screen. For Android, tap the 3-bar menu, and then tap Ancestors with Tasks. This feature will show you a list of relatives. Tap on any relative that has a blue record icon to see a possible record match.

The record matches shown might help you discover something new about your family or confirm information already in your tree. To find out, pick a record to explore, and tap the down arrow. You can read the record’s basic information there, or scroll down and tap the green button to compare the record to your ancestor’s profile.

As you are comparing information, notice the clickable icons and links. These icons and links help you see more information, attach this record to someone in your tree, and quickly add information to the family tree. (Click here to learn more about attaching and reviewing records.)

Record Hints on iOS

Record Hints on Android

Quick tip: Have you ever wanted to use multiple screens in the Family Tree app? Now you can! Read more here.

As more and more records are made available online, record hints can help you find newly added records without the hassle of repeated searching. The mobile app can help you make discoveries whenever you decide to pull out your device and take a look.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

See What the Family Tree Knows about an Ancestor—without Signing In

Open the Family Tree app to the signed-out screen, and tap the green button that says Search for an Ancestor. Enter information about one of your relatives, and then tap Search.

Logged out iOS Homescreen

Logged out Android Homescreen

FamilySearch will find records, photos, and more that might match your ancestor. Even if you don’t know specific details about a relative, try putting a last name into this simple search, and see what happens! Watch your friends’ faces light up when they find more information about their family.

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

How to Find a Relative While Signed In

Open the Family Tree app, sign in, and tap the search icon in the top right area of your screen. Enter at least your ancestor’s last name—the more details you add, the better! Then tap Find. This search is an easy way to learn about your family’s last name, quickly update a relative’s information, or find a relative and learn more about the family.

Using this feature on the FamilySearch Family Tree app can help you have a deeper connection to family, anywhere and anytime.

Find a Person on iOS

Find a Person on Android

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…

How to See Your Ancestors on a World Map

To see your ancestors’ life events on a world map, open the Family Tree app, and tap More on an iOS device or the 3-bar menu on an Android device. Then tap Map My Ancestors. A world map will appear with blue bubbles showing numbers of events that happened in a particular location or profile images of your ancestors. Tap any of the bubbles, or use two fingers to zoom in and out, and let the fun begin!

Map My Ancestors on iOS

Map My Ancestors on Android

Back to reading about the Family Tree app…


What Is RootsTech? The RootsTech

FamilySearch - Wed, 01/30/2019 - 15:03

What Is RootsTech?

The RootsTech genealogy conference is the world’s largest family history conference. It is dedicated to helping people discover their personal and family stories. Sponsored by FamilySearch, RootsTech is held every year and includes expert and beginner classes, a giant expo hall, and celebrity keynote speakers.

Where Is It?

RootsTech is held annually in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 2019, RootsTech will also expand to London, England.

Why You Should Attend

No matter your age or skill level, RootsTech has something for you. At this global event, you can discover more about yourself and your family, attend classes, and explore emerging technologies. Learn tips and tricks that can help you find your family and connect with family history experts and other attendees.

RootsTech offers more than classes. The expo hall can help you connect with all kinds of cool technologies and services that are dedicated to family history. Keynote sessions at RootsTech are also designed to celebrate family and inspire you to record and discover your own family stories.

Find Out More about RootsTech and What It Offers

Registration
 

About
 

Class Schedule
 

Family Discovery Day
 

Watch Online
 

 


How to Register for RootsTech

FamilySearch - Sat, 01/26/2019 - 22:41

Want to discover more about yourself and your family? Connect with people who are passionate about family history? Register for this year’s RootsTech Genealogy Conference!

As the world’s largest conference of its kind, RootsTech is dedicated to celebrating and discovering family connections. Come explore fun, modern technologies that can connect you to your past and present family. You won’t want to miss it.

When you register for RootsTech, you get access to a variety of classes, celebrity keynote sessions, and a giant expo hall that offers interactive experiences and previews of the latest technologies. Use the links below to register, learn about discounts, and find out more about this year’s conference.

Register for RootsTech Salt Lake City
 

Learn about RootsTech London Registration
 

Registration and Pricing Information

Find information about RootsTech passes and pricing below—including passes that will give you access to the full RootsTech conference, day passes, and a virtual pass for viewing online sessions. Register now for the best pricing. 

Compare RootsTech Passes
 

Registration Information for Family History Callings
 

RootsTech Schedule
 

Learn More about RootsTech

Learn more about RootsTech, the world’s largest family history conference!

 


Watch RootsTech Sessions Online

FamilySearch - Sat, 01/26/2019 - 17:20

Can’t make it in person to this year’s RootsTech genealogy conference? Select sessions of the world’s largest family history conference will be broadcast live on RootsTech.org. Watch sessions that are available for free, or get access to 18 additional recorded classes that will be available online by purchasing a virtual pass. Recorded content from past years can also be found in the RootsTech archives.


Watch RootsTech Live

 

Unsure of Whether to Watch RootsTech Live or Attend in Person?

RootsTech events have many classes and sessions to choose from, and only a few of them are broadcast for free each day. Many classes and RootsTech activities are hands-on and allow you to experience personally the latest family history technology, products, and services. Whether you are looking to discover more about yourself or your family, RootsTech is sure to have something for you! Take a look at the links below to learn more.

Live-Stream Schedule
 

RootsTech Salt Lake
 

RootsTech London
 

Learn more about RootsTech, the world’s largest family history conference!

 


What Is Family Discovery Day at RootsTech?

FamilySearch - Sat, 01/26/2019 - 16:50

Come and discover more about yourself and your family! With fun activities for kids, teens, and adults, Family Discovery Day at RootsTech is an event you won’t want to miss. At this free, 1-day event, you’ll explore modern, interactive technologies and learn more about your personal history. Bring your family along—ages 8 and up—or make it a personal day to connect with your heritage.

Also included in this special event are inspiring devotionals from leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Leaders share family history insights for people trying to connect with their past and present family. 

Save the Date for this Year’s Family Discovery Day:
March 2nd, 2019!
Register for Free

 

Elder and Sister Bednar are speaking at Family Discovery Day in 2019

When?—March 2nd, 2019 at 9:30 A.M. MST.

Where?—Salt Lake Palace Convention Center, in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Attend Elder Bednar’s talk in-person or watch the livestream on LDS.org!

View Content from Past Family Discovery Day Events

Did you miss last year’s Family Discovery Day? Watch videos and read summaries from past events.

Learn More about RootsTech

Learn more about RootsTech, the world’s largest family history conference!